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These Urban Dictionary Words Are Impossible To Get On The First Try

01/12/2016 01:41 EST | Updated 03/28/2017 05:33 EDT

When you reach for a dictionary, you'll definitely learn something new. If you log onto Urban Dictionary, chances are you'll learn something you may not want to know.

"What's the last thing you looked up on Urban Dictionary?"

"It was something dirty."

That exchange pretty much sums up what the site has become known for. Urban Dictionary came on the scene in 1999 and it has been an encyclopedia of dirty jokes ever since.

It is handy for overall slang too. The first time you heard "glo up," Urban Dictionary had the answer. And the same goes for "Netflix and chill," "squad goals," and any other words that were trending recently.

The site was originally founded by Aaron Peckham while he was in his first year of university. It was created as a parody of Dictionary.com, where community members could share slang being used at other universities. It exploded and became a way for youth to explore language and colloquialisms, although granted they're usually inappropriate.

Cafeteria antics are long behind us, but now it's time for a refresher course.

Our friends at BuzzFeed sat down and took turns at guessing the definitions of these — er — creative turns of phrase.

Most of them were wrong, and only two guesses were spot on. But failing this quiz, is not too surprising or disappointing at all — it's unlikely any of us would know what "unicorning" or a "clam jam" is without the help of the Internet.

If there's one thing this site does show, it's that this generation can be quite "creative and innovative," as one participant says. After all, studies have shown that knowing a myriad of swear words, also often means that you have a large vocabulary overall.

"It's just making our language way more colourful and expansive," another participant adds.

Check out the video above if you dare, but be warned, some of these just can't be unseen.

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