Judge Grants Suffering Woman Right To Die In B.C. First

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VANCOUVER � A British Columbia woman living with multiple sclerosis has become the first in the province to be granted a court exemption to have a doctor help her die.

B.C. Supreme Court Chief Justice Christopher Hinkson says in his written ruling that the woman, known in court documents as A.A., is experiencing intolerable pain and her suffering is unbearable for much longer.

A decision in February by the Supreme Court of Canada gave the federal government until June 6 to come up with assisted-dying legislation, but said patients could apply to a judge for an exemption in the meantime.

ellen wiebe
The judgment allows Dr. Ellen Wiebe (pictured) to provide A.A. with a voluntary lethal injection on or before May 4, 2016. (Photo: CP)

Hinkson's ruling says the woman meets all of the requirements for an exemption, including competence, consent and a lack of treatment options available.

The judgment allows Dr. Ellen Wiebe to provide A.A. with a voluntary lethal injection on or before May 4, 2016.

Wiebe helped a Calgary woman living with ALS end her life in February, and has been a vocal advocate for assisted-dying legislation.

Hinkson's ruling exempts Wiebe, two un-named registered nurses and two un-named registered pharmacists from being prosecuted in A.A.'s death.

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Physician-Assisted Dying in Canada - British Columbia Law Institute

Doctor Assisted Suicide Canada - Huffington Post