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Gordon Ramsay Baby: Star Chef Expecting Fifth Child With Wife Tana

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Gordon Ramsay has some exciting news! Fourteen years after welcoming his youngest child, Matilda, the 49-year-old chef is expecting his fifth child with wife Tana Ramsay.

Ramsay made the announcement on Thursday during an appearance on “The Late Late Show with James Corden.” Noting that the renowned chef has four teens at home – Megan, 18, twins Jack and Holly, 16, and Matilda, 14 – host Corden said, “That's a lot of hormones. Are you and Tana surviving that?”

“Uh, well. Three girls and a boy,” Ramsay replied, “And one more on the way!”

The “Hell’s Kitchen” star and his wife are expecting their little bundle of joy this September. Ramsay then revealed that he was hoping for another boy, as four girls might be overwhelming.

“I’m a little bit nervous,” Ramsay continued. “Obviously, I’d be happy with another girl, but four girls, four weddings, four sweet 16s, four boyfriends…”

A photo posted by Gordon Ramsay (@gordongram) on


While Ramsay and his wife Tana now have a big family, the couple previously struggled with fertility issues.

In 2007, the 49-year-old chef opened up about their experience, saying: “You plan a family, and it doesn't happen naturally. You depend on the IVF.”

“We had a miscarriage, which was quite a severe blow for our confidence,” he continued. “I had a very low sperm count on the back of standing in the kitchen for that length of time close to the stove. So we went through the motions. It was something we didn't want to hide. I'm far from being embarrassed about it.”

The couple used IVF to conceive their first child, Megan, and twins Holly and Jack. Tana then became pregnant with Matilda naturally, which came as a complete surprise.

Clearly Ramsay was meant to be a father. We couldn’t be more excited for him, his family and their upcoming bundle of joy!

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