B.C. Mom Writes Open Letter After Son With Down Syndrome Left Out Of Birthday Party. Then This Happened.

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A mother from Langley, B.C. wrote an open letter on Facebook Thursday after learning her son Sawyer, who has Down syndrome, was the only student not invited to a classmate's birthday party.

In her letter, Jennifer Kiss-Engele writes that she believes her son's disability — and the other parent's lack of understanding of his condition — was the reason Sawyer was left out.

UPDATE: June 26, 2016 - Kiss-Engele has since shared a “happy ending” to her story with Sawyer receiving an invitation to his classmate’s birthday party. “Of course he's been beaming ever since and can't stop talking about it,” she said.

"I know it’s not because he’s not fun, he has a great sense of humour and an infectious laugh," she writes. "I know it’s not because your child and him don’t get along, he’s brought up your child’s name on several occasions," she continues.

"The only reason why you decided it was OK to not invite my son to your child’s birthday party is because he has Down Syndrome."

She goes on to offer a prime about Down syndrome, saying those with the genetic disorder want close relationships, yearn to feel love, and have meaningful lives.

"And they want to go to birthday parties," she wrote.

"The only reason why you decided it was OK to not invite my son to your child’s birthday party is because he has Down Syndrome."

Sawyer's mom admits that she also was misinformed about her son's disability before he was born.

She has since realized stressing over her son about possible trouble he would face in connecting with his siblings and other children was unnecessary. Her other children have become more compassionate, she explained.

The post has been shared nearly 2,500 times on Facebook since it was posted.

"They will remember the time that their parent said to them, it’s not OK to leave someone out because of their disability, race, or gender."

Kiss-Engele also encouraged parents to talk to their children about inclusion.

"I know it can be difficult to teach our children about something we may not understand ourselves," the Langley mom writes, "But this is a great opportunity and life lesson to have with your child."

"They will remember the time that their parent said to them, it’s not OK to leave someone out because of their disability, race, or gender."

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