Nail Polish Drying Hacks That'll Get You Out The Door Faster

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Ever had to rush to give yourself a quick manicure that ended up getting smudged as soon as you walked out the door?

Yeah, us, too.

There's no question that most of us gals who love rocking nail polish hate waiting for it to dry. And while gel manicures seem to be the easy solution, there's not always enough time in the day to head to the salon or enough money in the bank to buy one of those fancy UV lamps.

But don't worry, in the video above, Everyday Genius lets you in on the simplest nail drying hack of them all. And it involves a freezer. Yup, after your DIY manicure, head to the kitchen and place your hand in the freezer for a few minutes. The cold temperature actually accelerates the drying process.

Or, try these other quick tips for quickly-dried tips:

Use cooking spray:



According to Refined Mom, you can ditch the expensive fast-drying nail polish aerosols for some good ol' cooking spray.

Many have tested out this method and have said not only does it leave your cuticles shiny and bright, but the oil makes for a great top coat. So next time you're worried about brushing up against something after you've freshly painted your nail beds, just spray a bit of cooking oil on them so the polish doesn't stick to anything.


Get a bowl of icy cold water:



Fashion Ends suggests you dip your newly painted nails in some icy cold water for when you're in a rush. Ice water will thicken polish, so after three minutes or so, you should have dry, shiny nails.


Use a hair dryer:

hair dryer

Yup, it's the old fashion way, but it is effective. Set your dryer on the low setting and temperature (don't burn yourself), and allowing the blowing air to set your polish in place.

Are there any other hacks you know of you try your nails quickly? Let us know in the comments below!

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