Winnie Harlow Pens Lengthy Instagram Post About Not Wanting To Be Called 'Brave'

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It's safe to say that 2016 has been a good year for Winnie Harlow.

The 22-year-old Canadian model starred in Beyonce's visual album, "Lemonade," landed herself a campaign with Swarovski and covered Wonderland magazine's summer 2016 issue — a lengthy list of credits for a model with vitiligo, especially in an industry that typically isn't inclusive.

However, Winnie (born Chantelle Brown-Young) doesn't want you to call her "brave" for being comfortable in her own skin. In fact, she just wants everyone to know she's a "confident normal ass human, not some being who 'must be so brave to go outside looking like that.'"

On Tuesday, Harlow took to Instagram to express her distaste for the "brave" label, writing, "If one more person calls me brave I think Imma flip my shit."

"That's the problem with 'equality.' We don't see ourselves as equals. We only see differences," she wrote in her post. "If someone without vitiligo has confidence they aren't deemed 'brave' ... Because I don't look like you it's so incredible to be confident? I don't want to look like you, I'm gorgeous."

The model continued the conversation in two more posts, explaining the difference between being brave and confident.

"I'm brave for many things, just like many other humans. I'm not brave for waking up and being confident in my skin. I am not brave for choosing not to wear makeup. That is confidence," she wrote.


A photo posted by ♔Winnie♔ (@winnieharlow) on

"Millions of people have vitiligo and aren't recognized," she concluded in her third post. "I'm known for my craft and my hard work. I'm known for my covers and campaigns. Don't try to belittle me to being my 'skin.' You aren't yours, and I'm not mine."

You're not your skin, neither am I.

A photo posted by ♔Winnie♔ (@winnieharlow) on

This isn't the first time Winnie has rejected a label — she's also been vocal about not wanting to be called a "role model."

"People may choose to see me as that, but it’s not how I identify or label myself," she says in an interview with HuffPost Canada’s Partner Studio. "A role model is someone who should be copied and emulated, and I don’t believe that people should copy anyone."

She continued, "We should just be who we are and always focus on our uniqueness and our opinion of our self. And by that I don’t mean that others’ opinions of you aren’t important; simply that your opinion of yourself is far more important."

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