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Study Shows That Acne-Sufferers Look Younger For Longer

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Acne sufferers, it's time to rejoice, because according to science, more breakouts mean younger-looking skin as you age.

According to a study published in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology, "people who have previously suffered from acne are likely to have longer telomeres (the protective repeated nucleotides found at the end of chromosomes) in their white blood cells, meaning their cells could be better protected against ageing."

acne

In other words, if you're a teenager who suffers from acne, things may feel like the end of the world, but your adult self may thank you because you have the ability to live longer as well as look younger longer compared to your pals with perfect skin.

The research, conducted by scientists at King's College London, analyzed 1,205 female twins, in which a quarter of the twins reported having experienced acne in their lifetime. Researchers measured the volunteers' white blood cells and skin samples and indicated those with acne cells have built-in protection caps (known as telomeres) on the ends of their chromosomes, which is likely to make them look better later in life.

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Is that a collective cheer we hear?

Lead researcher Dr. Simone Ribero, from King's College London, notes, "Dermatologists have long noted that the skin of acne sufferers appears to age more slowly than the skin of those with no history of acne. Signs of ageing such as wrinkles and skin thinning often appear much later in people who have experienced acne in their lifetime. It has been suggested that this is due to increased oil production but there are likely to be other factors involved."

So there you have it!

Teenagers, there's a silver lining in your battle with acne. With science now on your side, things will get better.

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