Schmaltz-Fried Kreplach With Challah Is Peak Jewish Comfort Food, Says Zane Caplansky

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Part of the fun of cooking is creating something new, different and food-coma inducing.

Zane Caplansky, owner of Caplansky's Delicatessen in Toronto, does just that with the Jewish dishes he grew up on.

For the pleasure of dumpling lovers everywhere, Caplansky stars in this episode of "Say It. Make It. Eat It.",and has put a spin on the traditional Jewish dumpling kreplach, by creating his own fried version: schmaltz-fried kreplach with challah.

For those wondering: "schmaltz" is said like "shh-malts," rhyming with "waltz," and with heavy emphasis on the "sh" sound. "Kreplach" is pronounced "crepe-lack." Be sure to really feel the words revving heavily in your throat, especially for "challah, which sounds like a thick "holla."

"It may be tough to say, but it's not tough to eat," the chef says.

Caplansky is here in the embedded videos to coach you through the Yiddish terms, as well as how to cook it for yourself.

With the smoked meat and ground beef filling, chewy dumpling shell and toasted challah, this dish fills every requirement for melt-in-your-mouth goodness. True to its name, it's fried in schmaltz, which is rendered chicken fat — an ingredient as essential to Jewish food as ghee is to Indian cooking.

And there's no need to add salt and pepper to taste. "Unless you want to kill people of course," Caplansky says.

Your bellies are grumbling already? Not surprised.

Sneak a peek behind the scenes with Caplansky during the filming of this episode:

"Say It. Make It. Eat It." is an AOL Canada Originals series that celebrates the multitude of cuisines from around the world that are loved by Canadians from coast to coast. Renowned chefs from the country's top restaurants and online food celebs show you step-by-step how properly say, make and enjoy some of their favourite dishes — and they'll fill you in on why these dishes are close to their hearts. Get ready to cook and dine like a pro, Canada.

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