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La Loche Shooting Motive Hasn't Emerged Yet

06/14/2017 11:09 EDT | Updated 06/20/2017 19:50 EDT

MEADOW LAKE, Sask. — As a hearing continues today for a teenager who killed four people and injured seven in La Loche, Sask., no motive for the devastating crime has yet emerged.

The teen, who can't be named because he was just under 18 at the time, has pleaded guilty to two counts of first-degree murder, two counts of second-degree murder and seven counts of attempted murder.

The court is now considering whether he will be sentenced as a youth or an adult.

On Tuesday, psychiatrist Dr. Declan Quinn said he's as puzzled about a motive now as he was the first time he met with the teen.

la loche The suspect's lawyer said there isn't a simple explanation for what happened.

Clinical psychologist Katelyn Harker said the teen told his case worker at a youth custody facility that he got "an extreme scary rush after pulling the trigger.''

Crown prosecutor Lloyd Stang told reporters outside court that we may never know the exact reasons behind what happened.

"I did not expect any magic moment in court where we would all of a sudden understand why things happened,'' Stang told reporters.

"We're getting bits and pieces of information from a variety of sources and we may never know the exact reasons behind what occurred.''

la loche Prime Minister Justin Trudeau lays a wreath at a memorial during a visit to the town of La Loche, Saskatchewan January 29, 2016. (Photo: Matthew Smith/Reuters)

The teen pleaded guilty last fall to killing brothers Dayne and Drayden Fontaine in a home in La Loche before shooting up the high school where teacher Adam Wood and teacher's aide Marie Janvier died.

There were suggestions in the shooting's aftermath that the teen had been bullied at school, but he told police that wasn't the case.

His lawyer, Aaron Fox, has said there isn't a simple explanation for what happened, but added his client does have cognitive, social and developmental issues.

Fox noted Tuesday that the teen was in Grade 10 for the third time when the shooting occurred and numerous special tests in elementary school had all indicated problems.

"The more information that can be placed in front of the judge about the youth and his background and his make up and his family and his upbringing, all of that will be helpful and relevant at the end,'' Fox said outside court.

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