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HuffPost Canada Housing Newsletter: It's Going To Be A Cool Summer For Toronto Real Estate

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06/28/2017 13:47 EDT | Updated 06/28/2017 13:48 EDT
Bloomberg via Getty Images
Cranes operate at a condominium under construction in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, on Saturday, May 27, 2017. Photo: Brent Lewin/Bloomberg via Getty Images

This week's newsletter is written by Ron Nurwisah, who has a small collection of charming fridge magnets.

It looks like it's going to be a cool summer for Toronto's real estate market. HuffPost Canada's business editor Daniel Tencer writes about the slowdown in prices. Most forecasters would say the GTA market is due for a soft landing rather than a crash. This might spell bad news for speculators looking to cash out of the market. But for young Torontonians looking to buy a new home, this might just be the break they need.

On the other hand, Better Dwelling points out that prices for Toronto's condos seem to be holding firm. But whether this pattern holds as the market cools further remains to be seen.

Our favourite read this week is this interview with architect Moshe Safdie, the man responsible for Montreal's iconic Habitat 67. Safdie also spoke to Architectural Digest on what it was like to live in the gorgeous building.

— Ron Nurwisah

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On HuffPost Canada

Getty

Toronto House Prices Have Already Fallen 12% From Their Peak

The slowdown in Greater Toronto's housing market this spring appears to be more than a one-month blip.

Getty

Montreal's Renters Are Sharing Information To Prevent Price-Gouging

A non-profit group has launched the site MyRent.quebec, where users can share and compare monthly rental rates and other details about their apartments such as utilities and whether pets are allowed.

Neighbouring Reads

Where Canadian Housing Affordability Is Deteriorating Fastest (BuzzBuzz Home)

U.S. Cities Where Million Dollar Homes Are Cropping Up (Curbed)

How Do You Decorate Your Fridge (Curbed)

Toronto, Vancouver: Housing Bubbles Or Simply World-Class Cities (Globe and Mail)

Carmageddon Is Coming? (Medium)

Quoted

Most of what's still being built in cities is pretty depressing: inhumane towers facing each other, shadow and light indiscriminately being blocked.Moshe Safdie, architect of Habitat 67

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