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London Tube Ditching 'Ladies And Gentlemen" For Gender-Neutral Greetings

The move will ensure all passengers feel welcome.

07/14/2017 11:53 EDT | Updated 07/14/2017 11:53 EDT

In a move to be more inclusive, the London Tube will be ditching its "Ladies and gentlemen" greetings for a more gender-neutral reception.

According to the BBC, London Underground staff will now say greetings like "Hello, everyone" to ensure all passengers feel welcome.

The change, which was supported by London mayor Sadiq Khan, comes after various groups, including the LGBT charity Stonewall, campaigned for the move. The group claimed that the greeting "Ladies and gentlemen" was "outdated" and "belonged to yesterday."

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A woman rides a tube escalator decorated with the Pride flag colours on July 5, 2017 in London, England. The annual Pride Festival takes place in London fromJune 24 to July 9 2017 and includes the Pride in London parade on July 8. (Photo by Carl Court/Getty Images)

The new greeting won't just be delegated to staff; pre-recorded announcements will also be making the switch over across the transportation network.

"We want everyone to feel welcome on our transport network," said Mark Evers, director of customer strategy at Transport for London (TfL).

"We have reviewed the language that we use in announcements and elsewhere and will make sure that it is fully inclusive, reflecting the great diversity of London."

During a Mayor's Question time last month, Khan said that "time to time, well-meaning staff may still use the term 'ladies and gentlemen.' If this happens frequently, TfL will issue reminders to staff."

[We] will make sure that it is fully inclusive, reflecting the great diversity of London.

Stonewall reminded Londoners that language is important when talking to and about members of the LGBTQ community.

"Language is extremely important to the lesbian, gay, bi and trans community, and the way we use it can help ensure all people feel included," they said in a statement.

"We welcome gender neutral announcements to be rolled out across TfL as it will ensure that everyone - no matter who they identify as — feels accounted for."

According to Mashable, the idea to change the greeting came after London commuter Aimee Challenor, a transgender woman, was told she "didn't sound like a Miss" during a telephone call to the Tube's helpline in Sept. 2016.

Language is extremely important to the lesbian, gay, bi and trans community, and the way we use it can help ensure all people feel included.

Avoiding heterosexual bias in language is part of the Tube's goal, but in day-to-day life, if you're not sure how to refer to someone, Junkee, an Australian website, has some suggestions.

"Whether it's figuring out if they prefer 'he' or 'she', or understanding someone's relationship dynamic — politely and privately give them the opportunity to educate you. By providing people from marginalised groups with a platform to speak, we allow them to choose how they are referred to, rather than our language being policed from the outside," writes Amy Middleton.

"If someone makes a language mistake, correct them by all means. If someone calls you out on a mistake, try to see the positive side: you have learnt something, and you've created an opportunity for discussion and education."