PARENTS

Disney Changes Its Outdated Policy On What Kids Can Dress Up As

It's all about imagination, after all.

09/01/2017 11:46 EDT | Updated 09/01/2017 11:57 EDT
ktmoffitt via Getty Images

Who says boys can't be princesses, at the very least in their imagination?

U.K. mom Hayley McLean-Glass was shocked to discover that, according to Disneyland Paris anyway, boys were not permitted to partake in the "Princess for a Day" experience.

Writing on her blog, Sparkles and Stretch Marks, McLean-Glass explained she had emailed the park asking if her three-year-old son Noah, a "'Frozen' super fan," could be booked for an appointment, which includes makeup, hair and a dress (depending on the package).

In response, the park told her it wasn't possible for a boy:

Sparkles and Stretch Marks

McLean-Glass, needless to say, was unimpressed, and took to her site to lambast the company for its outdated views.

I NEVER expected the reply I received from somewhere that claims to bring magic to the world.

"My son is very young, he doesn't yet have any idea that there is such judgment and outdated perspectives in the world. He has no reason at all to believe that anybody would ever see anything wrong in a child playing dress up ... and I have no desire at all to expose him to the ridiculous inequality of this world until it's absolutely necessary, so I decided to check that this would be ok just in case any behind-the-times staff member on the day was to make a comment that would burst his bubble and make him doubt himself and the things he likes.

"I NEVER expected the reply I received from somewhere that claims to bring magic to the world and introduces these beloved characters to children."

So in response, Disney ... changed their policy.

Posting on Instagram, McLean-Glass said that Disneyland Paris had emailed to tell her that boys and girls would be able to do anything they wanted at the park and the staff would be brought up-to-date to reflect the change.

Reflecting on a hectic and stressful few days, but it was worth every uneducated neanderthal troll encounter in the end because Noah (and every other little boy who wants to...) SHALL go to the ball! (or ..you know...the Princess For A Day experience!) Disneyland Paris emailed me last night to confirm that Noah and all other little boys and girls are welcome to all experiences at the park, their staff will all be briefed so that this kind of thing will not happen again, and they have also acted upon my suggestion to change the wording on their website advertising this experience from "Grant every little girls wishes with a Princess experience..." to "Grant every childs wishes..." ❤️❤️ I feel like I've taken more abuse in the last two days than ever before in my whole life added together, but if it changes the experience of one other little boy it was worth it... I usually shy away from confrontation of any kind so I'm a bit proud of myself for taking this on.... "Be the change you wish to see in the world". As for Noah...this photo was taken a few weeks ago, its him looking at himself in the mirror. Considering all the homophobes of the world like to think I "pushed this on him"....it looks like he's pretty happy with what he sees in that mirror to me, don't you agree?

A post shared by Parenting Blogger Hayley (@sparklesandstretchmarks) on

It's a small victory, to be sure, but one that hopefully can be rolled out across the Disney empire, since it's not quite reflected in their language and images just yet.

At Walt Disney World in Orlando, for example, the Bibbidi Bobbidi Boutique touts itself as a place that "offers magical makeovers for young princesses and knights," but shows only pictures of girls dressed up as the iconic female characters.

Walt Disney World

That isn't to say that staff won't accommodate dressing up boys, at least according to a commenter on McLean-Glass' post, but they certainly don't advertise it.

Considering that accepting and supporting your child is one of the best things you can do for their mental health, it makes very little sense to keep them from pursuing this kind of dream, especially when it harms exactly no one else.

Please do explain to me what terrible awful fate may befall him if you indulge him in his desire to have his hair done, put on an Elsa dress and wear a bit of blusher for a photo?

As McLean-Glass put it, "Please do explain to me what terrible awful fate may befall him if you indulge him in his desire to have his hair done, put on an Elsa dress and wear a bit of blusher for a photo? Because frankly, I am baffled."

Hopefully more public spaces for kids will follow the lead very soon.

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