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Harry Proves He's The People's Prince During CN Tower Visit

All the selfies!

09/27/2017 11:07 EDT | Updated 09/27/2017 16:06 EDT

There's a buzz in Toronto, and no, we're not talking about the insects that seem to have taken advantage of the city's heatwave.

We're talking about the hype surrounding Prince Harry's visit to Ontario's capital for the 2017 Invictus Games.

Chris Jackson via Getty Images
Prince Harry meets fans during the Invictus Games 2017 at the CN Tower on September 26, 2017 in Toronto, Canada (Photo by Chris Jackson/Getty Images for the Invictus Games Foundation)

On Tuesday evening, the fifth-in-line (soon to be sixth-in-line) to the British throne visited the CN Tower for a reception, but before he entered the building, he took time to greet fans who had been waiting to catch a glimpse of the prince for more than an hour.

According to the Toronto Star, "People stood on concrete blocks and nearly fell over each other trying to get a selfie with him, or simply capture an image [the prince}.

Getty Images for the Invictus Games Foundation
Prince Harry meets fans during the Invictus Games 2017 at the CN Tower on September 26, 2017 in Toronto, Canada (Photo by Chris Jackson/Getty Images for the Invictus Games Foundation)

Much like his late mother, Princess Diana, who was later dubbed "The People's Princess" after she died, Harry wasn't shy about getting close to his fans, dolling out handshakes, chatting with them, and letting them snap selfies.

And like his mum, Harry seemed to possess a warmth and easy camaraderie with complete strangers, making us think he should be called the People's Prince.

The visit was actually the 33-year-old's second time at the CN Tower. In 1991, Harry, who was seven at the time, and Prince William went up the tower and spent time looking through telescopes, reports the Toronto Star.

Unfortunately for fans, Harry's girlfriend, "Suits" actress Meghan Markle, was nowhere to be seen.

On Monday, the world got their first glimpse of the couple when they made their official debut together at an Invictus Games wheelchair tennis match.

Karwai Tang via Getty Images
Meghan Markle and Prince Harry attend the Wheelchair Tennis on day 3 of the Invictus Games Toronto 2017 at Nathan Philips Square on September 25, 2017 in Toronto, Canada. (Photo by Karwai Tang/WireImage)

Over the weekend, while she didn't sit beside her boyfriend of more than one year, Markle, 36, was spotted just a few rows over, cheering for the athletes at the Invictus Games opening ceremony.

And although we love seeing them fawn over each other (seriously, there was so much PDA happening at that tennis match), for Harry, it's all about the athletes.

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WireImage
Soho House consultant Markus Anderson (L) and actress Meghan Markle attend the opening ceremony on day 1 of the Invictus Games Toronto 2017 at Air Canada Centre on September 23, 2017 in Toronto, Canada. (Photo by Karwai Tang/WireImage)

On Monday, the prince attended the annual Canadian Institute for Military and Veteran Health Research (CIMVHR) and discussed why the Games, and sports in general, are important for the physical and mental well-being for those in the military and veterans. The Invictus Games, which Harry founded in 2014, use the power of sport to inspire recovery, support rehabilitation and generate a wider understanding and respect for the Armed Forces.

"We are dangling a carrot of sporting glory to help reignite qualities which have been worn down by months and often years of fighting. Fighting to find purpose, fighting to reconnect with family, fighting to get fit again, fighting to leave the house and in some cases fighting to stay alive," Harry said to guests.

WireImage
Prince Harry attends the Rowing at the Invictus Games Toronto 2017 at the Mattamy Athletic Centre on September 26, 2017 in Toronto, Canada. (Photo by Karwai Tang/WireImage)

He continued: "Sport, of course, is not the only answer, but it is a hugely powerful tool. People find motivation and purpose in many different things. But in my mind, there is no denying the impact that teamwork, competition and fun has on someone's well-being and outlook."

Clearly, Harry's passion, not only for the Invictus Games, but for people and society as a whole, is genuine. It's no wonder why the world loves him!

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