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Tips for Going to an Ottawa Senators Game

04/16/2013 05:28 EDT | Updated 06/16/2013 05:12 EDT
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NEWARK, NJ - APRIL 12: Daniel Alfredsson #11 of the Ottawa Senators looks on against the New Jersey Devils during the game at the Prudential Center on April 12, 2013 in Newark, New Jersey. (Photo by Andy Marlin/NHLI via Getty Images)

Marc Dupont takes 20 minutes to put on his game-face. It's thick black paint that the night would envy.

When complete, the soft-spoken government worker looks like a menacing warrior ready to terrorize. Along with the paint, Dupont wears a gladiator outfit that cost $1,200 on eBay and carries a plastic sword and sometimes a giant flag with the emblem of his team, the Ottawa Senators.

His outfit is made of metal and hard plastic, with enough bulk that it makes it hard to do anything but stand. Turns out that's a good thing, because when Dupont and his fellow gladiators -- self-professed "Superfans" -- go to a game they don't have a seat anyway.

"We have an agreement with the team that they give us access to the arena and we come to boost up the crowd, add some spirit to the rink," he said during a recent game against the New York Rangers, which the Senators won at Scotiabank Place.

Dupont and his friend Jesse Jodoin began the ritual of donning gladiator outfits in 2007, the year the Senators went to the Stanley Cup finals, losing in five games to the Anaheim Mighty Ducks. They and other gladiators attend about 10 games a year each in costume.

The Sens' gladiators have become one of the attractions at the NHL rink that seats 19,153. Along with the kid-friendly mascot, Spartacat, the gladiators pump up a crowd that is regarded as too quiet. When the Toronto Maple Leafs and Montreal Canadiens play road games in Ottawa, it's routine to hear fans of the visiting side drown out the home team's supporters.

This year, the Senators asked season-ticket holders to refrain from selling their seats to fans of rival teams, particularly the Leafs and Canadiens. The request was met with snickers from observers around the league, several of whom said the team should focus on getting more out of its own fans rather than thwarting efforts of others trying to reach the rink.

Tips for Going to an Ottawa Senators NHL Game

It's a perplexing situation that has existed since the team's inception in 1992. Despite the fact the Senators have been one of the NHL's winningest teams over the past 12 seasons, the rink isn't always full and it's not always loud.

One reason is because of location. Scotiabank Place is the only NHL arena in Canada that isn't within the urban centre of a city. It's in Kanata, about 20 kilometres from downtown Ottawa, a drive that can be aggravatingly long, which is why most weekday home games start at 7:30 pm rather than 7 o'clock like in other Canadian markets. A downtown rink attracts a boisterous crowd ready to make a night of it, win or lose.

At Scotiabank Place, the overwhelming majority of attendees must drive. That means less drinking, which means less noise -- and that's not a bad thing. Senators fans are among the league's most polite and respectful. If you're a fan, you can follow the action without worrying if the hooligan next to you is going to drop his beer on your lap (unless of course your neighbour is wearing a Leafs jersey, in which case you'd be advised to find Dupont or Jodoin to heckle him into an early departure).

Before and after the games, Bert's is jumping, with live music and sports action on 23 large TV screens. It's a festive place, with tiki bar decor and other Caribbean touches inspired by Bert's in Barbados, which Senators owner Eugene Melynk has a stake in. Concession booths at Scotiabank Place are, not surprisingly, overpriced but Bert's prices and fare are what you would expect to find at any sports bar.

When making your decision on where to stay for the game, your first option should be the Brookstreet Hotel. Besides being extremely comfortable, the Brookstreet is the place where visiting NHL teams choose when they're in town for a game.

The players aren't off-limits either. I found myself in an elevator with the Rangers' Rick Nash and dining alongside some of his teammates at Perspectives restaurant.

"All of the teams have very specific menus they want us to create," chef Clifford Lyness said.

"More and more, we're seeing requests for organic dishes. We work closely with the team's nutritionists and sometimes the requests can be a challenge, but we always do whatever we can to meet their needs."

To read more tips about where to stay and what to do when going to an Ottawa Senators game, visit Vacay.ca.

For what it's like to go to jam-packed Rexall Place for an Edmonton Oilers game, click here.

For what it's like to go to a Calgary Flames game, click here.

2013 NHL Season Highlights