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Cameron Fenton

Writer and climate organizer with 350.org

Born and raised in Edmonton, Alberta, Cameron has worked on climate justice issues all across Canada. He currently works as the Canadian Tar Sands Organizer with 350.org. @CamFenton
Chris Wattie / Reuters

Climate Leaders Don't Build Pipelines

Back in 2011, Canada made history by being the first country to formally pull out of the Kyoto Protocol. It was a bold move, but yesterday, Justin Trudeau actually managed to one up the feat, albeit in different style. On Tuesday, he approved the Kinder Morgan and Line 3 tar sands pipelines making Canada the first country on the planet to, in effect, promise to break the commitments they made to under the Paris Climate Agreement.
11/30/2016 03:02 EST
Chris Wattie / Reuters

Approving Pipelines Would Put Trudeau In League With Trump

When Justin Trudeau said that "Canada has no closer friend, partner, and ally than the United States," in his statement responding to the election of Donald Trump as the 45th President, he was right. But while Trudeau extolled how this should mean collaboration with Trump, being the kind of climate leader the world needs is going to mean Trudeau standing up to Trump, not sitting down with him.
11/09/2016 04:53 EST
Adrian Wyld/CP

Is Justin Trudeau Listening To Pipeline Concerns, Or Just Pretending?

During the 2015 election, the Liberal Party promised to listen to Canadians in an unprecedented way, and as we get closer to marking the first year of their government, signs have been good that they're trying to follow through. So much so that when it comes to climate change, it can feel like the government is trying to consult us to death. When it comes to climate consultation, the federal government is great at asking questions, but are they actually listening to the answers? The truth is, I don't know. The government of Canada, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Minister of Natural Resources Jim Carr in particular, have made no secret that they want to approve a pipeline.
08/11/2016 12:35 EDT
ASSOCIATED PRESS

Trudeau Has Broken His Promise To Overhaul The National Energy Board

While it's so ridiculous that you can't help but laugh at it, it's also unjust, anti-democratic and something that Canada's new prime minister promised would never happen again. Last June, now-Prime Minister Justin Trudeau unveiled his party's environmental platform standing with his back to the Burrard Inlet in Vancouver's Kitsilano neighborhood. With a withering critique that Stephen Harper's government had "chosen to be a cheerleader instead of a referee" when it came to pipelines, he promised a complete overhaul of the National Energy Board assessment process.
01/21/2016 05:23 EST
Krakozawr via Getty Images

Canada's Climate Inaction Undermines Its Words In Paris

I am really confused by my government right now, because when it comes to climate action, it feels like I have two different governments. One government is in Paris, and their words on climate sound like the kind of ambition we need. The other one is in Ottawa, and its actions are looking more and more like the Harper government's on climate change.
12/08/2015 10:57 EST
CP

Alberta's New Climate Plan Is Historic, But It's Not Enough

Emissions targets were the kind of policy that we needed in the tar sands a decade ago, but today the measure of climate leadership isn't a target for what you won't put in the air -- it's legislation that listen to the science and keeps fossil fuels in the ground.
11/23/2015 09:00 EST
CP

Why We're Giving Justin Trudeau A Climate Welcome

Both Trudeau and his new ministers have their work cut out from them when it comes to really getting Canada back on course on climate. That's why today, I'm outside of Trudeau's home with dozens of other people kicking off what could be largest act of civil disobedience on climate change in Canada's history.
11/05/2015 04:51 EST
michal kodym via Getty Images

Anyone But Harper Might Not Be Enough to Tackle Climate Change

With the 42nd federal election in the books here in Canada, now the clock starts ticking down the 42 days until the Paris climate talks begin. The good news is that Stephen Harper is no longer the Prime Minister of Canada. After nearly a decade in power, Harper has left a sea of devastation in his wake when it comes to climate change. Here's the bad news: while Stephen Harper's government may have been a supporter of the fossil fuel industry, Justin Trudeau has failed to distinguish himself as a much better option.
10/20/2015 06:03 EDT