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Charles Lammam

Director of Fiscal Studies, Fraser Institute

Charles Lammam is Associate Director of Tax and Fiscal Policy at the Fraser Institute. Since joining the Institute, Mr. Lammam has published more than 25 research reports and 100 original commentaries on a wide range of economic policy issues such as taxation, government finances, investment, entrepreneurship, income mobility, labour, pensions, public-private partnerships, and charitable giving. His commentaries have appeared in every major Canadian newspaper including the National Post, Globe and Mail, Ottawa Citizen, Toronto Sun, Montreal Gazette, Calgary Herald, and Vancouver Sun. He is a frequent contributor to Fraser Forum, the Fraser Institute’s flagship policy magazine. Mr. Lammam also regularly gives presentations to various groups, comments in print media, and appears on radio and television broadcasts across the country to discuss the Institute’s research. He has appeared before committees of the House of Commons as an expert witness. Mr. Lammam holds an MA in public policy and BA in economics with a minor in business administration from Simon Fraser University.
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Why Everyone Wins With Public-Private Partnerships

As governments here in Canada wrestle with the challenge of providing high-quality transportation infrastructure, they should increasingly consider public-private partnerships, or P3s. The record shows P3s are more likely to be built on time and on budget, and they offer greater value for money than conventional infrastructure projects.
06/13/2013 10:04 EDT

Tax Freedom Day Was Bittersweet

In 2013, Canadians worked until June 10, which happens to be Tax Freedom Day, to pay all their taxes. Tax Freedom Day is an easy-to-understand measure of the total tax burden imposed on Canadian families by federal, provincial, and local governments. But the true tax burden doesn't end with the revenues that governments collect.
06/12/2013 05:14 EDT

How Much We Pay in Taxes: 1961 V.S. 2012

given the litany of taxes levied on us by the three levels of government, it is nearly impossible to get a sense of how much we truly pay. That's why in a recent report we calculate and track the total tax bill of the average Canadian family from 1961 to 2012.
05/06/2013 08:37 EDT

Should Canadians Be Paying More in Taxes than Basic Necessities?

Families now pay more in taxes that they do for basic necessities. While personal income taxes are the single largest type of tax paid by families, they represent less than one-third of the total. There are a host of less visible taxes that Canadians pay but do not see.
04/28/2013 12:38 EDT
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Do You Want Your Taxes Higher, Or Higher Still?

British Columbia is officially in election mode and the parties are rolling out their campaign promises. When it comes to the tax promises of the two mainstream parties, British Columbians are confronted with a choice, as it were, between higher taxes or even higher taxes. So go ahead and pick your poison.
04/26/2013 02:05 EDT
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Return Of The PST Darkens B.C.'s Economy

It was no joke; on April 1st B.C. officially scrapped the HST and in one fell swoop, restored the old Provincial Sales Tax system. But moving back to the PST will cause harm to the provincial economy and B.C. families will lose out on the increased prosperity and jobs that the HST would have encouraged. Since our province will be poorer with the PST, it falls on our political leaders to take action to lessen the impact.
04/11/2013 06:38 EDT
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B.C. Budget 2013: How To Tame The Deficit?

Tuesday's provincial budget is supposed to present a plan to finally balance the books. But after four consecutive years in the red, British Columbians can't yet breathe a collective sigh of relief. Critically important is how Finance Minister Mike de Jong plans to eliminate the deficit. Will he take the path of tax increases or spending reductions? He would be wise to go with the latter. And this is why...
02/18/2013 02:05 EST

The Decline of Corporate Montreal

Over the years, Quebec has earned a reputation as being hostile to business due to persistent anti-business policies. As a consequence, Montreal has declined as a hub for major corporate headquarters. With a lower concentration of large corporate headquarters, the city loses out on many economic benefits. The government of Quebec should take seriously the long term decline of Montreal as a major corporate hub.
01/31/2013 05:16 EST

Will Wynne Untangle Ontario's Fiscal Mess?

Having won the Ontario Liberal Party's leadership, Premier-designate Kathleen Wynne has a golden opportunity to chart a new course and undo Dalton McGuinty's legacy of fiscal mismanagement. As Wynne contemplates priorities for her leadership she should seriously consider putting Ontario's deficit and debt problem on the top of her to-do list
01/30/2013 05:37 EST
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Don't Tax the Rich

The reality is that raising taxes on upper-income earners comes at a large economic cost. It's true that polls consistently show majority support for increasing taxes on the wealthy. But so what? Populism is hardly a sufficient yardstick for good policy.
01/23/2013 05:35 EST
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Your Share of Canada's Government Debt: $34,000+

The management of public finances may not have received due attention from the premiers in Halifax. But as our federal and provincial political leaders gear up for next year's budget season, they would be wise to acknowledge the seriousness of growing government debt and put forth bold plans to balance their budgets. Kicking the debt down the road simply isn't an option.
12/17/2012 06:01 EST
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How Dalton McGuinty Botched Fiscal Policy

At a recent political event, outgoing Premier Dalton McGuinty touted his legacy as leader of Ontario. "Our government hasn't been perfect," he said. "But when it comes to the big things that families count on us to get right -- schools, health care, the environment, and the economy -- we've gotten it right every time." As is often the case, there's a gap between rhetoric and reality. That's certainly the case when it comes to McGuinty's claim about the economy.
12/13/2012 05:46 EST

The Fact Missing From Income Inequality Talk

Given the debate over the past few years about income inequality and the fact that many people do not consider how the income of individuals change over time, a new study, "Measuring Income Mobility in Canada" recently published by the Fraser Institute, provides fresh evidence on how the incomes of Canadians change over the course of their lives. While we welcome thoughtful criticisms of our methods and analysis, a recent blog penned by Professor Michale Wolfson of the University of Ottawa does a disservice to the discussion when he suggests the results are misleading and the analysis was done unfairly without adequate justification.
12/05/2012 05:07 EST