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David Suzuki

Co-founder, David Suzuki Foundation

Dr. David Suzuki is a scientist, broadcaster, author, and co-founder of the David Suzuki Foundation. He is Companion to the Order of Canada and a recipient of UNESCO's Kalinga Prize for science, the United Nations Environment Program medal, the 2009 Right Livelihood Award, and Global 500. Dr. Suzuki is Professor Emeritus at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver and holds 26 honorary degrees from universities around the world. He is familiar to television audiences as host of the long-running CBC television program The Nature of Things, and to radio audiences as the original host of CBC Radio's Quirks and Quarks, as well as the acclaimed series It's a Matter of Survival and From Naked Ape to Superspecies. His written work includes more than 52 books, 19 of them for children. Dr. Suzuki lives with his wife, Dr. Tara Cullis, and family in Vancouver, B.C.
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One Year After Cohen Report, Salmon Face an Upstream Battle

The record decline in sockeye returning to the Fraser River in 2009 provided the initial push for a federal judicial inquiry. Now, four years later, the offspring of those salmon are returning to spawning grounds in dismally low numbers -- so low that sockeye salmon fishery closures are widespread. What happened to Justice Bruce Cohen's 75 carefully crafted recommendations to rebuild Pacific salmon?
10/23/2013 12:25 EDT
AP

Help Solve an Orange-and-Black Mystery

What weighs less than a paperclip, tastes terrible and can travel thousands of kilometres without a map? Hint: this delicate critter is tawny-orange with black veins and white spots and has been mysteriously absent from Canada this summer.
10/16/2013 11:02 EDT
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Despite Fukushima, Scientists Say Eating West Coast Fish is Safe

Due to continued contamination following the Fukushima disaster, social media is now abuzz with people swearing off fish from the Pacific Ocean. Given the lack of information around containment efforts, some may find this reasonable. But preliminary research shows fish caught off Canada's Pacific Coast are safe to eat.
10/09/2013 12:43 EDT
AP

Scientists Agree: We Made Climate Change Happen

The IPCC just released the first of four chapters of its Fifth Assessment Report. It shows scientists are more certain now that humans are largely responsible for global warming. When they say 95 per cent certain -- as the latest report does regarding human contributions to climate change -- that's as close to certainty as science usually gets. Evidence for climate change itself is "unequivocal."
10/02/2013 12:26 EDT
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Climate Change Deniers Don't Deserve an Equal Voice

Many news outlets are complicit in efforts to undermine scientific evidence. The attacks on legitimate climate science are coming from people whose arguments have been debunked many times and who often have ties to the fossil fuel industry.
09/25/2013 12:30 EDT
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Some Places on Earth Should Remain Untouched

Areas of Earth that have remained relatively free of industrial development have taken on a special significance. In Canada, they include awe-inspiring landscapes like the Sacred Headwaters in northwestern B.C. But the Sacred Headwaters is not protected under law. It remains at risk from a multitude of proposed mines, railways, transmission lines and other projects that will eviscerate the landscape if approved.
09/18/2013 12:04 EDT
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Burning Garbage Is Like Burning Resources

Many urban areas have built or are considering building waste-incineration facilities to generate energy. At first glance, it seems like a win-win. You get rid of "garbage" and acquire a new energy source with fuel that's almost free. But it's a problematic solution, and a complicated issue.
09/11/2013 07:49 EDT
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Do You Believe in Mind Control or Climate Change?

Why do some people believe in phenomena rejected by science, like chemtrails, but deny real problems demonstrated by massive amounts of scientific evidence, like climate change. Why do so many people accept a theory for which there is no scientific evidence while rejecting a serious and potentially catastrophic phenomenon that can be easily observed and for which overwhelming evidence has been building for decades? The problem is that science denial is, in the case of chemtrails, a wacky distraction and, in the case of climate change denial, a barrier to addressing an urgent, critical problem.
09/04/2013 12:13 EDT
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Beaver Lake Cree Case Reveals Flaws in Environmental Review Process

There is a fundamental flaw in the current environmental assessment process: It focuses on each proposed development as something that stands alone. But an individual well or dam is not separate or isolated from its surroundings -- air, water, plants and animals pay no attention to our imposed, artificial boundaries. We can't anticipate long-term consequences of any major technology if we are ignorant of how the world works, yet the consequences persevere.
08/28/2013 12:37 EDT
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Save the Whales, But Don't Forget About the Bugs

We focus on charismatic species like whales, pandas, cedar trees and seals as poster children for conservation. But the small things that keep the biosphere going for creatures like us are probably more threatened because we ignore them. If we spend time studying them, they have much to teach us.
08/14/2013 08:24 EDT
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Why You Should Give a Buzz About Bees

Bees are endlessly intriguing, and incredibly useful to us -- and not just for honey and wax. If bees disappeared, it would be difficult, if not impossible, to grow much of what we eat. The economic value of pollination services from honeybees alone is estimated at $14 billion in the U.S. and hundreds of millions in Canada.
07/31/2013 12:06 EDT
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What's the Value of Something We Can't Live Without?

More than 13 per cent of Canada's gross domestic product depends on healthy ecosystems, according to Environment Canada. it seems absurd to try to assign worth to something so vital we can't survive without it. Who needs nature? We do. Without nature, we would not be here. How do we put an economic value on that?
07/24/2013 12:21 EDT
AP

Rail, Pipeline and Climate Disasters Are Symptoms of Oily Addiction

Like smokers who put off quitting until their health starts to suffer, we're learning what happens when bad habits catch up with us. We're witnessing the terrible effects of fossil fuel addiction every day. Transport accidents are also increasing as governments and industry scramble to get fuels out of the ground and to market as quickly as possible.
07/17/2013 12:20 EDT
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Let's Hatch a Plan to Save the World's Birds Before it's Too Late

We can't live without birds. Beyond being fascinating and beautiful, they play a crucial role in keeping the world habitable for all life, including people. They disperse seeds, pollinate plants, control insects, provide food and are indicators of the overall health of ecosystems. One in eight -- or 1,313 -- species of Earth's birds is in danger of disappearing.
07/10/2013 08:16 EDT
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The Best Way to Stop the Floods

News of the devastating floods in Alberta hit Canadians hard. While calls are mounting for the need to rebuild and strengthen infrastructure such as dikes, storm-water management systems and stream-channel diversion projects, we've overlooked one of our best climate change-fighting tools: nature.
07/03/2013 12:22 EDT
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Cycling Is Smart But Cyclists Need to Get Smarter

The personal and societal benefits of getting out of your car and onto a bike are well-known. Still, despite the many arguments in favour of cycling, increased infrastructure always incites criticism -- most of it unwarranted. And the behaviour of some cyclists doesn't help.
06/26/2013 12:20 EDT
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Is Alberta Flooding a Sign of Climate Change?

Can we say the recent flooding and extreme weather in Southern Alberta and B.C. were caused by global warming? Maybe not, but we can say we should expect more of the same -- and worse if we don't do something to get our emissions under control. As many scientists warn, climate change isn't coming; it's here. We may be able to adapt to and cope with some of its current effects, but it will become increasingly difficult if we continue to ignore the need to wean ourselves off fossil fuels, through conservation and switching to cleaner energy.
06/21/2013 03:22 EDT

We Ignore Scientists at Our Peril

Climate change deniers are out in full force, many employing methods common to those who reject science. Science isn't perfect, but it's one of the best tools we have for understanding our place in the cosmos.
06/19/2013 08:13 EDT