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David Suzuki

Co-founder, David Suzuki Foundation

Dr. David Suzuki is a scientist, broadcaster, author, and co-founder of the David Suzuki Foundation. He is Companion to the Order of Canada and a recipient of UNESCO's Kalinga Prize for science, the United Nations Environment Program medal, the 2009 Right Livelihood Award, and Global 500. Dr. Suzuki is Professor Emeritus at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver and holds 26 honorary degrees from universities around the world. He is familiar to television audiences as host of the long-running CBC television program The Nature of Things, and to radio audiences as the original host of CBC Radio's Quirks and Quarks, as well as the acclaimed series It's a Matter of Survival and From Naked Ape to Superspecies. His written work includes more than 52 books, 19 of them for children. Dr. Suzuki lives with his wife, Dr. Tara Cullis, and family in Vancouver, B.C.
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Where Would We Be if These Greats Never Stood Up for Change?

Change is never easy and it often creates discord, but when people come together for the good of humanity and the Earth, we can accomplish great things. Those are the lessons from Nelson Mandela, Rosa Parks and all those who refuse to give up in the face of adversity when the cause they pursue is just and necessary.
01/08/2014 12:21 EST
Wayne R Bilenduke via Getty Images

Let's Make Sure 2014 Isn't an "Annus Horribilis"

It's been a strange year. From the never-ending carnival of calamity at Toronto City Hall to the scandalous subterfuge on Parliament Hill, from horrific attacks by the Syrian government on its own citizenry to disasters inflicted by extreme weather on the people of the Philippines, 2013 recalls Queen Elizabeth's description of 1992 as an annus horribilis. On top of it all, those of us who have taken on the often thankless task of trying to encourage people to care for the air, water, soil and diversity of plants and animals that keep us alive came under increasingly vituperative attacks from the media and even our own government.
12/11/2013 09:06 EST
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Canadians Have the Right to Live in a Healthy Environment

Canada is blessed with some of the last vestiges of pristine nature on Earth -- unbroken forests, coastlines and prairies, thousands of rivers, streams and lakes, open skies, abundant fresh air. We are also defined by our Constitution. Our Constitution's Charter of Rights and Freedoms gives us freedom of expression, equal protection from discrimination and the right to life, liberty and security of the person. But it doesn't mention the environment. How can we fully enjoy our freedoms without the right to live in a healthy environment?
12/04/2013 08:19 EST
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The Deadly Price of Being An Environmentalist

Too often, governments are quick to use excessive force and even pervert the course of justice to keep oil and gas flowing, forests logged, wild rivers dammed and minerals extracted. As the Global Witness study reveals, citizens are often killed, too. A recent report by human rights organization Global Witness documents the murders of more than 700 environmental and indigenous-rights activists over the past decade.
11/27/2013 12:25 EST
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Climate Change Could Throw Atlantic Canada into Chaos

We sometimes too easily overlook Canadians in the Maritimes and Newfoundland and Labrador -- coastal regions, like ours, on the front lines of climate change. Atlantic Canada faces risks if climate change is left unchecked, with more severe storms causing surging tides, flooding and widespread coastal erosion.
11/20/2013 12:31 EST
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Philippines Tragedy Shows Canada Needs a Climate Change Wake-Up Call

As people in the Philippines struggle with the devastation and death from the worst storm to hit land in recorded history, world leaders are meeting in Warsaw, Poland, to discuss the climate crisis. Given the slow progress at the 18 meetings held since 1992 -- when countries from around the world joined the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change -- it's hard not to be pessimistic. Canada, in particular, has been repeatedly singled out among the close to 200 member countries for obstructing progress and not doing enough to address climate change at home.
11/13/2013 08:59 EST
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Getting Dirty May Be Good for You

For much of human history we lived close to the natural world. As civilization evolved we became increasingly urbanized, and most of us now live in cities. As we've moved away from nature, we've seen a decline in other forms of life. Biodiversity is disappearing.
11/06/2013 12:39 EST
AP

Who Can We Trust to Discuss Climate Change Seriously?

It's sad to see so much of our media and governance in such a sorry state that we can't even expect rational discussion of critical issues such as climate change and energy policy. The science is clear that it is real and that we are a major contributor, mainly through burning fossil fuels and cutting down forests.
10/30/2013 12:16 EDT
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One Year After Cohen Report, Salmon Face an Upstream Battle

The record decline in sockeye returning to the Fraser River in 2009 provided the initial push for a federal judicial inquiry. Now, four years later, the offspring of those salmon are returning to spawning grounds in dismally low numbers -- so low that sockeye salmon fishery closures are widespread. What happened to Justice Bruce Cohen's 75 carefully crafted recommendations to rebuild Pacific salmon?
10/23/2013 12:25 EDT
AP

Help Solve an Orange-and-Black Mystery

What weighs less than a paperclip, tastes terrible and can travel thousands of kilometres without a map? Hint: this delicate critter is tawny-orange with black veins and white spots and has been mysteriously absent from Canada this summer.
10/16/2013 11:02 EDT
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Despite Fukushima, Scientists Say Eating West Coast Fish is Safe

Due to continued contamination following the Fukushima disaster, social media is now abuzz with people swearing off fish from the Pacific Ocean. Given the lack of information around containment efforts, some may find this reasonable. But preliminary research shows fish caught off Canada's Pacific Coast are safe to eat.
10/09/2013 12:43 EDT
AP

Scientists Agree: We Made Climate Change Happen

The IPCC just released the first of four chapters of its Fifth Assessment Report. It shows scientists are more certain now that humans are largely responsible for global warming. When they say 95 per cent certain -- as the latest report does regarding human contributions to climate change -- that's as close to certainty as science usually gets. Evidence for climate change itself is "unequivocal."
10/02/2013 12:26 EDT
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Climate Change Deniers Don't Deserve an Equal Voice

Many news outlets are complicit in efforts to undermine scientific evidence. The attacks on legitimate climate science are coming from people whose arguments have been debunked many times and who often have ties to the fossil fuel industry.
09/25/2013 12:30 EDT
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Some Places on Earth Should Remain Untouched

Areas of Earth that have remained relatively free of industrial development have taken on a special significance. In Canada, they include awe-inspiring landscapes like the Sacred Headwaters in northwestern B.C. But the Sacred Headwaters is not protected under law. It remains at risk from a multitude of proposed mines, railways, transmission lines and other projects that will eviscerate the landscape if approved.
09/18/2013 12:04 EDT
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Burning Garbage Is Like Burning Resources

Many urban areas have built or are considering building waste-incineration facilities to generate energy. At first glance, it seems like a win-win. You get rid of "garbage" and acquire a new energy source with fuel that's almost free. But it's a problematic solution, and a complicated issue.
09/11/2013 07:49 EDT
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Do You Believe in Mind Control or Climate Change?

Why do some people believe in phenomena rejected by science, like chemtrails, but deny real problems demonstrated by massive amounts of scientific evidence, like climate change. Why do so many people accept a theory for which there is no scientific evidence while rejecting a serious and potentially catastrophic phenomenon that can be easily observed and for which overwhelming evidence has been building for decades? The problem is that science denial is, in the case of chemtrails, a wacky distraction and, in the case of climate change denial, a barrier to addressing an urgent, critical problem.
09/04/2013 12:13 EDT
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Beaver Lake Cree Case Reveals Flaws in Environmental Review Process

There is a fundamental flaw in the current environmental assessment process: It focuses on each proposed development as something that stands alone. But an individual well or dam is not separate or isolated from its surroundings -- air, water, plants and animals pay no attention to our imposed, artificial boundaries. We can't anticipate long-term consequences of any major technology if we are ignorant of how the world works, yet the consequences persevere.
08/28/2013 12:37 EDT
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Save the Whales, But Don't Forget About the Bugs

We focus on charismatic species like whales, pandas, cedar trees and seals as poster children for conservation. But the small things that keep the biosphere going for creatures like us are probably more threatened because we ignore them. If we spend time studying them, they have much to teach us.
08/14/2013 08:24 EDT