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David Suzuki

Co-founder, David Suzuki Foundation

Dr. David Suzuki is a scientist, broadcaster, author, and co-founder of the David Suzuki Foundation. He is Companion to the Order of Canada and a recipient of UNESCO's Kalinga Prize for science, the United Nations Environment Program medal, the 2009 Right Livelihood Award, and Global 500. Dr. Suzuki is Professor Emeritus at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver and holds 26 honorary degrees from universities around the world. He is familiar to television audiences as host of the long-running CBC television program The Nature of Things, and to radio audiences as the original host of CBC Radio's Quirks and Quarks, as well as the acclaimed series It's a Matter of Survival and From Naked Ape to Superspecies. His written work includes more than 52 books, 19 of them for children. Dr. Suzuki lives with his wife, Dr. Tara Cullis, and family in Vancouver, B.C.
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Nature Calms The Brain And Heals The Body

For the most part, our brains didn't evolve in cities. But in a few decades, almost 70 per cent of the world's people will live in urban environments. Despite the prosperity we associate with cities, urbanization presents a major health challenge. Cities, with their accelerated pace of life, can be stressful. The results are seen in the brains and behaviour of those raised in cities or currently living in one.
04/13/2016 02:41 EDT
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Got Milkweed? Monarch Butterflies Still Need Your Help

Three years ago, the eastern monarch butterfly population plummeted to 35 million, a drop of more than 95 per cent since the 1990s. More than a billion milkweed plants, which monarchs depend on for survival, had been lost throughout the butterfly's migratory range -- from overwintering sites in Mexico to summer habitat in Canada. A lot has changed in three years, but there's still more work to do if we're to save the ailing monarch population.
04/06/2016 12:31 EDT
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Going Geothermal: Tapping Into Earth's Abundant Energy

Despite the many benefits of geothermal, Canada is the only "Pacific Ring of Fire" country that doesn't use it for commercial-scale energy. New Zealand, Indonesia, the Philippines, the United States and Mexico all have commercial geothermal plants. Iceland heats up to 90 per cent of its homes, and supplies 25 per cent of its electricity, with geothermal. We need to join them.
03/30/2016 12:43 EDT
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Environmental Deficit Tarnishes Canada's Rights Record

Many Canadians see our country as a human rights leader, but a United Nations committee says we should do better. In early March, the Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights concluded that Canada's lack of environmental protection and climate action mars our rights record. This recognition may be just emerging in international human rights law, but it's nothing new to Indigenous people and many others who directly depend on nature for food and livelihood.
03/23/2016 03:26 EDT
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World Water Day Reminds Us Of Clean Water's Value

Earth's oceans, lakes, rivers and streams are its circulatory system, providing life's essentials for people, animals and ecosystems. Canada has one-fifth of the world's freshwater, a quarter of its remaining wetlands and its longest coastline. With this abundance, it's easy to take water for granted. Many of our daily rituals require its life-giving force. Yet do we recognize our good fortune in having clean, safe water at the turn of a tap?
03/16/2016 11:28 EDT
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Change Is In The Air

When Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria was assassinated in June 1914, no one thought, "Uh-oh, World War I is starting..." We only recognize the significance of events in the context of history. I recently had a day like any other except it made me wonder if we're on the verge of historical change.
03/09/2016 11:08 EST
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Will Cap-and-Trade Slow Climate Change?

Ontario is expected to reduce emissions by over four per cent a year -- about twice the initial rate of California -- and generate $1.9 billion annually from the plan. That money will be invested in "green" projects throughout the province with the goal of reducing carbon emissions even further. Ontario's proposal to give away many allowances to big emitters is less encouraging. The government says it will eventually phase out this free disbursement, but in the meantime millions of dollars in government revenue that could be used to support renewable energy and public transit will be lost.
03/02/2016 11:16 EST
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Energy Storage Gives Renewables A Jump-Start

Renewable energy with storage has a number of advantages over fossil fuels. It can discharge power to the grid to meet demand more quickly and efficiently, and it's less prone to disruption, because power sources are distributed over a large area, so if one part is knocked out by a storm, for example, other parts keep the system running.
02/17/2016 01:42 EST
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It's Time To Protect The Great Bear Rainforest's Grizzlies

The agreement between government, industry, First Nations and environmental groups to protect much of the Great Bear Rainforest should be celebrated. However, while the agreement helps protect grizzly bear and other wildlife habitat, it doesn't protect the bears themselves, contrary to B.C. Premier Christy Clark's claims at a news conference.
02/10/2016 12:55 EST
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Solar: A Brilliant Way To Get Energy

Every hour, the sun bathes the Earth with enough energy to supply our needs for more than a year. There's no reason we can't harness more of it to cut back on polluting, climate-altering fossil fuels.
02/03/2016 10:08 EST
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Environmental Rights Are Human Rights

When I was a boy, we drank water from lakes and streams without a thought. I never imagined that one day we would buy water in bottles for more than we pay for gasoline. Canada has more fresh water per capita than any nation, but many indigenous communities don't have access to clean drinking water. Surely, in a nation with so much natural wealth, we should expect better appreciation, treatment and protection of the air, water, soil and rich biological diversity that our health, prosperity and happiness depend on. The right to live in a healthy environment is recognized by more than 110 nations -- but not Canada.
01/20/2016 10:59 EST
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Do You Want To Exploit The Planet, Or Experience It?

Is a forest a sacred grove or merely lumber and pulp? Are rivers the veins of the land or sources of power and irrigation? Is soil a community of organisms or simply dirt? Is another species our biological relative or a resource? Is our house a home or just real estate? Is this how we treat our source of survival? Until all of society understands this and then acts on that understanding, we will not be able to act fully to protect a future for ourselves.
01/12/2016 04:50 EST
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The One Way We Can All Make 2016 A Year Of Hope

Those who fear and reject change have always been and always will be with us. They've argued ending slavery would destroy the economy; they've claimed putting people on the moon would be impossible; they've rejected ending South Africa's apartheid system; they've said the Berlin wall wouldn't come down. We can and must speak louder than those who would keep us on a destructive path despite the overwhelming evidence that it's past time to shift course.
01/05/2016 03:41 EST
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Paris Agreement Marks A Global Shift For Climate Action

When our children's children look back to what we did to keep our planet livable, they may see this year's United Nations climate conference in Paris as a turning point. The 21st Conference of the Parties (COP21) may have been our last chance for a meaningful agreement to shift from fossil fuels to renewable energy before ongoing damage to the world's climate becomes irreversible and devastating. Government ministers, negotiators and world leaders spent the first two weeks of December creating a guide for the next stage of humanity's action on climate change.
12/16/2015 08:45 EST