profile image

David Suzuki

Co-founder, David Suzuki Foundation

Dr. David Suzuki is a scientist, broadcaster, author, and co-founder of the David Suzuki Foundation. He is Companion to the Order of Canada and a recipient of UNESCO's Kalinga Prize for science, the United Nations Environment Program medal, the 2009 Right Livelihood Award, and Global 500. Dr. Suzuki is Professor Emeritus at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver and holds 26 honorary degrees from universities around the world. He is familiar to television audiences as host of the long-running CBC television program The Nature of Things, and to radio audiences as the original host of CBC Radio's Quirks and Quarks, as well as the acclaimed series It's a Matter of Survival and From Naked Ape to Superspecies. His written work includes more than 52 books, 19 of them for children. Dr. Suzuki lives with his wife, Dr. Tara Cullis, and family in Vancouver, B.C.
Pete Saloutos via Getty Images

Where Is the Political Leadership to Confront Climate Change?

Once lauded for policies such as the carbon tax and energy agreements with California, B.C.'s political leaders have now embraced liquefied natural gas, claiming industry expansion will create hundreds of thousands of jobs and add billions of dollars to provincial coffers -- never mind that no one in power now will be held accountable for these promises because they're several elections from being realized.
01/07/2015 09:23 EST
peelwatershed/Flickr

Looking Back on the Blue Dot Tour and Ahead to the New Year

I recently travelled across Canada with David Suzuki Foundation staff, from St. John's to Victoria and up to Yellowknife, joined by friends and allies along the way. To resolve the serious environmental issues we face in Canada and beyond, we need people from across the country and all walks of life to join together to make protecting the people and places we love a priority.
12/17/2014 01:13 EST
Yagi Studio via Getty Images

A New "National Park" Could Be Coming to a City Near You

Canada's newest "national park" is a vibrant patchwork of green space meandering through dynamic downtown neighbourhoods in one of Canada's densest metropolises, along the former path of a creek buried more than 100 years. It's a welcoming space for birds and bees that's nurturing a new generation of city-builders. And it may spread to your city.
12/03/2014 12:47 EST
Barnabas Kindersley via Getty Images

Conditions in First Nations, Metis and Inuit Communities are Canada's National Shame

While Winnipeg residents enjoy clean water, the people of Shoal Lake 40 suffer from substandard water. It's an abrogation of the basic right of all Canadians to have access to clean, safe drinking water. The fact that such deplorable conditions persist in places like Shoal Lake, and in hundreds of other First Nations, Metis and Inuit communities across Canada, is a national shame and must be resolved immediately.
11/26/2014 01:40 EST
PeopleImages.com via Getty Images

The Environment Needs Citizen Scientists

Smartphones, the Internet and accessible research technologies deinstitutionalize science and get the inner scientist in all of us outside to contribute to a broader understanding of a variety of topics, from backyard birds to flower-blooming times. Science relies on observation. As more people examine natural phenomena and record and share information, we gain better understanding of the world. An increasing number of scientific inquiries now depend on contributions from ordinary people to help them answer important questions.
11/18/2014 05:24 EST
SeppFriedhuber via Getty Images

2014 Could Be the Hottest Year on Record. What's the Plan, Canada?

It's become a cliché to say that out of crisis comes opportunity. But there's no denying that when faced with crises, we have choices. The opportunity depends on what we decide to do. What choices will we make when confronted with the fact that 2014 will likely be the hottest year on record? Will politicians close their eyes while fossil fuel industry executives shovel money at them and enlist propagandists to spread misinformation and lies?
11/12/2014 08:34 EST
Getty

Canada Has to Join the Environmental Rights Movement

The idea of a right to a healthy environment is getting traction at Canada's highest political levels. Federal Opposition MP Linda Duncan recently introduced "An Act to Establish a Canadian Environmental Bill of Rights" in Parliament. If it's passed, our federal government will have a legal duty to protect Canadians' right to live in a healthy environment.
11/05/2014 12:51 EST
Getty Images

Clean Tech Is Good For the Economy and Environment

Although extraction, use and export of natural resources are economically important and will remain so for some time, we're starting to diversify. According to Ottawa-based consultants Analytica Advisors, clean technology, or clean-tech, is the country's fastest-growing industry. The firm's "2014 Canadian Clean Technology Report," found direct employment by clean-tech companies rose six per cent from 2011 to 2012, from 38,800 people to 41,000, with revenues increasing nine per cent to $11.3-billion.
10/22/2014 01:02 EDT
AP

When it Comes to the Environment, Canada Has a Black Thumb

Sadly, the inability of governments to deal with climate change is neither just national, nor recent. We've been saddled with government indolence on climate and pollution for far too long, and in far too many places around the world. But Canada has been singled out for getting in the way of progress at global climate negotiations, and we're the only country to have pulled out of the legally binding Kyoto Protocol.
10/15/2014 09:10 EDT
Facebook

There Will Be No Peace if the Site C Dam Is Approved

At an estimated $7.9 billion and growing, the proposed Site C Dam on the beautiful Peace River in northeastern B.C. has been criticized. If built, Site C would violate First Nations' rights under Treaty 8, rendering them irrelevant to the point of mockery. How long will Treaty 8 First Nations be able to sustain a vibrant, living culture when the dam devastates their land and communities?
10/01/2014 12:56 EDT
ASSOCIATED PRESS

Prescription For Human Health: Fight Global Warming

Reducing the threat of global warming and finding ways to adapt to unavoidable change will also help people around the world "deal with the impact of heat, extreme weather, infectious disease and food insecurity." Climate change affects human health in multiple ways.
09/10/2014 12:32 EDT
YouTube

Dying Birds Are Environmental Canaries in the Coal Mine

Birds have long been the "canaries in the coal mine" for our destructive ways. Extinction of the passenger pigeon sparked the first large environmental movement in the U.S., and led to restrictions on hunting, as well as federal and international regulations to protect migratory birds. Now, birds face a range of new problems, most caused by humans and many serving as further warnings about our bad habits.
09/03/2014 08:07 EDT
KSM Project

A Wake-up Call for Canada's Mining Industry

When a tailings pond broke at the Mount Polley gold and copper mine in south-central B.C., spilling millions of cubic metres of waste into a salmon-bearing stream, B.C. Energy and Mines Minister Bill Bennett called it an "extremely rare" occurrence, the first in 40 years for mines operating here. He failed to mention the 46 "dangerous or unusual occurrences" that B.C's chief inspector of mines reported at tailings ponds in the province between 2000 and 2012, as well as breaches at non-operating mine sites.
08/27/2014 08:53 EDT
XiXinXing via Getty Images

Politicians: Clean Water, Air and Soil Should Be Your Priority

We are, above all else, biological beings, with an absolute need for clean air from the moment of birth to the last death rattle. We are about 60 per cent water by weight, so we need clean water to be healthy. We eat plants and animals for our nourishment, so whatever they're exposed to ends up in our bodies. We need clean soil to give us clean food. These are basic, biological facts and should be the prism through which any decision is made at individual, corporate or government levels. Protection of air, water, soil and the web of life should be the highest social, political and economic priority.
08/20/2014 08:37 EDT