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David Suzuki

Co-founder, David Suzuki Foundation

Dr. David Suzuki is a scientist, broadcaster, author, and co-founder of the David Suzuki Foundation. He is Companion to the Order of Canada and a recipient of UNESCO's Kalinga Prize for science, the United Nations Environment Program medal, the 2009 Right Livelihood Award, and Global 500. Dr. Suzuki is Professor Emeritus at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver and holds 26 honorary degrees from universities around the world. He is familiar to television audiences as host of the long-running CBC television program The Nature of Things, and to radio audiences as the original host of CBC Radio's Quirks and Quarks, as well as the acclaimed series It's a Matter of Survival and From Naked Ape to Superspecies. His written work includes more than 52 books, 19 of them for children. Dr. Suzuki lives with his wife, Dr. Tara Cullis, and family in Vancouver, B.C.
ASSOCIATED PRESS

Prescription For Human Health: Fight Global Warming

Reducing the threat of global warming and finding ways to adapt to unavoidable change will also help people around the world "deal with the impact of heat, extreme weather, infectious disease and food insecurity." Climate change affects human health in multiple ways.
09/10/2014 12:32 EDT
YouTube

Dying Birds Are Environmental Canaries in the Coal Mine

Birds have long been the "canaries in the coal mine" for our destructive ways. Extinction of the passenger pigeon sparked the first large environmental movement in the U.S., and led to restrictions on hunting, as well as federal and international regulations to protect migratory birds. Now, birds face a range of new problems, most caused by humans and many serving as further warnings about our bad habits.
09/03/2014 08:07 EDT
KSM Project

A Wake-up Call for Canada's Mining Industry

When a tailings pond broke at the Mount Polley gold and copper mine in south-central B.C., spilling millions of cubic metres of waste into a salmon-bearing stream, B.C. Energy and Mines Minister Bill Bennett called it an "extremely rare" occurrence, the first in 40 years for mines operating here. He failed to mention the 46 "dangerous or unusual occurrences" that B.C's chief inspector of mines reported at tailings ponds in the province between 2000 and 2012, as well as breaches at non-operating mine sites.
08/27/2014 08:53 EDT
XiXinXing via Getty Images

Politicians: Clean Water, Air and Soil Should Be Your Priority

We are, above all else, biological beings, with an absolute need for clean air from the moment of birth to the last death rattle. We are about 60 per cent water by weight, so we need clean water to be healthy. We eat plants and animals for our nourishment, so whatever they're exposed to ends up in our bodies. We need clean soil to give us clean food. These are basic, biological facts and should be the prism through which any decision is made at individual, corporate or government levels. Protection of air, water, soil and the web of life should be the highest social, political and economic priority.
08/20/2014 08:37 EDT
Daisy Gilardini via Getty Images

Climate Change Deniers Are Getting Desperate (and Personal)

The Heartland Institute's recent International Climate Change Conference in Las Vegas illustrates climate change deniers' desperate confusion. Personal attacks are common among deniers. Their lies are continually debunked, leaving them with no rational challenge to overwhelming scientific evidence that the world is warming and that humans are largely responsible.
08/06/2014 12:27 EDT
ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Blue Dot Tour: It's About All of Us

How can anyone who has even seen a photo of the Earth treat our small blue home with disdain and carelessness? How can anyone fail to recognize how precious and finite the resources, especially water, are -- and that we must share and care for what we have?
07/30/2014 01:35 EDT
Getty Images

Canada's Cities Lead the Way on Climate Action

Amid the dire warnings about global warming's impacts, what's often overlooked is that actions to reduce or prevent them will lead to livable communities, improved air quality, protection of natural spaces and greater economic efficiency, to name just a few benefits. So it's not surprising that tangible positive action on climate change is happening in Canada's cities. Local progress can spur even greater momentum as cities collaborate with each other and other levels of government.
07/23/2014 12:29 EDT
Dave Garvin/Flickr

Lake Huron Is No Place for a Nuclear Waste Dump

Is dilution really the solution to pollution -- especially when it's nuclear waste that can stay radioactive for 100,000 years? A four-member expert group told a federal joint review panel it is. The Great Lakes are already threatened by pollution, agricultural runoff, invasive species, climate change and more. We can't afford to add the risk of radioactive contamination to one of the world's largest sources of fresh water.
07/16/2014 12:30 EDT
ASSOCIATED PRESS

Yes, Climate Change Will Hurt Your Bottom Line

Those who don't outright deny the existence of human-caused global warming often argue we can't or shouldn't do anything about it because it would be too costly. Take Prime Minister Stephen Harper, who recently said, "No matter what they say, no country is going to take actions that are going to deliberately destroy jobs and growth in their country." But in failing to act on global warming, many leaders are putting jobs and economic prosperity at risk, according to recent studies.
07/09/2014 12:25 EDT
Getty

1 of Every 3 Bites of Food Depends on Bees -- Let's Save Them

Bees may be small, but they play a big role in human health and survival. Some experts say one of every three bites of food we eat depends on them. The insects pollinate everything from apples and zucchini to blueberries and almonds. If bees and other pollinators are at risk, entire terrestrial ecosystems are at risk, and so are we.
07/02/2014 08:44 EDT
Darren_Sutherland via Getty Images

This Canada Day, Think Radical

Canada was once seen as a country where respect for each other and our land, air, water and biodiversity were valued. Now, some government leaders and their industry and media supporters threaten those who dare question the mad scramble for short-sighted, short-term profits at the expense of the environment, our health and the world's climate systems, and label us "radicals."
06/25/2014 12:53 EDT
Darryl Dyck/CP

Harper's Pipeline Decision Is a Blow to Democracy

A pipeline to carry diluent from the coast to the tar sands to dilute bitumen that would then be carried back to the coast in another pipeline for export to world markets in supertankers does not have a "sufficiently direct connection" to the tar sands? And the impacts of the tar sands and its products on climate are not relevant to the project that makes these impacts possible? What the hell? This project should never go ahead.
06/18/2014 08:31 EDT
Doug Allan via Getty Images

Remember: Our Oceans Are Defined By What We Put In Them

Although the conservation challenge is daunting, nurturing functioning ecosystems offers hope. Healthy oceans ensure we can continue to enjoy seafood -- and they're more resilient to increasing human impacts. If the global fishing industry wants to ensure its survival, it should advocate for marine ecosystem conservation.
06/04/2014 12:16 EDT
David McNew via Getty Images

Stop the Government From Fracking Our Way To 'Prosperity'

Perceived economic benefits (mostly short-term) trump the needs of all Canadians and their children and grandchildren for clean air and water, healthy food and a stable climate. Droughts, floods, water shortages, insect-plagued forests, extreme weather events, rising sea levels and melting glaciers don't matter as much as getting the oil, gas and coal out of the ground and sold as quickly as possible.
05/28/2014 12:47 EDT
George Peters via Getty Images

Investing in Transit Drives Our Cities to Be Healthier and Happier

There's growing recognition that prioritizing transit is crucial to moving a region forward. Transit-oriented cities have better air quality with lower greenhouse gas emissions and benefit from reduced traffic congestion with shorter commuting times. Evidence even shows people in cities with a range of transportation options, like Vancouver, are less sedentary, get more exercise and are happier and healthier as a result.
05/21/2014 08:34 EDT