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Marc Davis

Business writer, health and wellness blogger

A long-standing journalist, Marc writes mostly about business but also has a passion for covering the health and wellness topics. His articles have appeared in dozens of publications all over the world, including most of North America's best-known newspapers.
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How Gold Investment Gurus Turn Lemons Into Lemonade

The global economic recovery is stumbling badly. Even in the U.S., weakening corporate earnings are deflating stock prices. We can all see that, too. Increasingly, the "smart money" is betting on gold. That is because gold bullion has traditionally been prized as a hedge against both economic malaise and political crises.
06/02/2016 04:34 EDT
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Modern Stress And Our Misfiring Minds

When you're stressed, you could be experiencing agitation, impatience, an increase in annoyance, pessimism, depression, and self-doubt. Some of this negativity can even act itself out on a subconscious level. And this can be really hard on the people around you.
05/16/2016 10:27 EDT
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Why We're All At Risk For Heart Disease

If you're still relatively young, don't roll your eyes because you don't think this topic is relevant to you. Instead, consider this sobering fact: While a heart attack comes on quickly, cardiovascular disease typically develops over many years, even decades.
04/13/2016 01:30 EDT
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How Sleep Loss Leads To Weight Gain

Here's an eye-opener that'll probably make you want to keep 'em closed: Most of us are sleep deprived. And it's taking a toll on our health. Sleep deprivation, or even just a lack of quality sleep, can stress your body by elevating your cortisol levels. When levels of this stress hormone are high, your body goes into survival mode, meaning it stores body fat.
03/31/2016 10:50 EDT
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Don't Underestimate Stress: How It Harms And Ages Your Body

The irony for many of us is that our "stress response" has become even more damaging to our health than the everyday events that trigger our stress. In other words, we typically tend to preoccupy our minds with these stressful incidents long after they're over. And so the cortisol keeps flowing long after it should have abated.
03/24/2016 12:42 EDT