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Ontario Association of Food Banks

Provincial Food Bank Network

The Ontario Association of Food Banks (OAFB) is a network of 120 food banks and over 1,100 hunger relief programs and agencies across the province. Together, we serve 400,000 individuals, including 148,000 children, every month. Since our inception in 1992, we have been committed to reducing hunger in Ontario through sustainable solutions that ensure the long-term health and success of communities across the province. Please visit our website, www.oafb.ca for more information, or follow us on Twitter @OAFB.
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Without Affordable Housing, the Need for Food Banks Will Remain

This past holiday season, food banks all across Ontario benefited from the generosity of their communities. Ontarians came together to donate food and financial support, both of which will make an enormous difference in the lives of people who struggle to make ends meet. Yet as the holiday lights and warmth fade and we head back into everyday life, we must not forget that this is not enough. In Ontario alone, it is estimated that 770,000 people visit food banks annually, and 20 per cent of food banks run out of supplies at least once every year. In a province that has more than enough food for everyone, why is this happening?
01/27/2015 05:36 EST
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What It's Like to Be a Young Food Bank Client

As a 26-year-old business professional I face very typical problems on a day to day basis, ones that many of you may face. I have to deal with traffic, I have to find parking in downtown Toronto, I have to deal with deadlines. But it wasn't that long ago that any of these trivial issues were not a concern to me as my only burden was finding my next meal. For two years I battled homelessness and my hope was dependant on youth homes and the kindness of strangers.
12/02/2014 05:27 EST
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For 375,000 Ontarians, Thanksgiving Dinner Isn't a Reality

It must be fall, bringing with it Thanksgiving. This October, however, more than 16,000 families in Ontario will have no other choice but to visit a food bank for the first time in their entire lives. And while the idea of turkey dinner with all the trimmings certainly sounds delicious, for over 375,000 adults and children, it is simply not the reality of the season.
10/08/2014 05:48 EDT

Hunger Awareness Week: Who Do You Think Uses the Food Bank?

At the provincial level, the Ontario Association of Food Banks strongly believes that the provincial government can and should take a more active role in tackling the root causes of hunger. This Hunger Awareness Week, ask yourself: who do you think uses food banks, and more importantly, why? Together, we can take a stand against hunger and poverty.
05/03/2014 11:41 EDT
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This Holiday Season, Remember Those Who Go Without

This month, the Ontario Association of Food Banks released their annual Hunger Report, highlighting the prevalence of food bank use and the need for emergency food services in this province. This past March, 375,789 Ontarians accessed a food bank. As you finish up your holiday shopping, please remember that there are so many Canadians going without this festive season.
12/18/2013 12:25 EST
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Ontario's History-Making Deal For Farmers

This tax credit is groundbreaking for two reasons; the first of which being that farmers deserve, and need, a tax credit to help cover the costs of harvesting and transporting produce to food banks. Until this week, farmers donated thousands of pounds of fruits and vegetables out of sheer generosity to our provincial food bank network.
11/05/2013 05:38 EST
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More than a Food Bank

Food banks started in Canada many years ago as what is often described as a "band-aid solution" to the growing issue of hunger. Food banks were supposed to be temporary, local groups that fed the poor, while the government developed the official resolution to this societal problem. Unfortunately, this resolution was never found, and food banks are now a staple in each corner of Canada. Believe me when I say that food banks do not want to be in business. As a provincial association, a large part of our focus is on advocating on behalf of food banks and the clients that we serve. There is a reason that people are hungry, and it is not because of a lack of food in this country.
10/12/2013 08:02 EDT

The Local Food Act That Could Make a Difference in Ontario

With the current economic state in Ontario, many individuals are struggling to put meals on the table each and every day. Prices are rising across the board for food staples, and it is becoming increasingly difficult to find accessible, affordable, and nutritious food. Since being re-introduced to legislature, the Local Food Act has passed its first reading.
04/15/2013 05:42 EDT
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Without Your Donation, Food Banks Need a Christmas Miracle

Food banks in Ontario are experiencing incredibly tough times this holiday season. In many areas across this province, food bank donations are down compared to previous years. With Christmas only a few days away, food banks across the province are hoping for a holiday miracle to help reach their food drive targets.
12/22/2012 06:58 EST
AP

Don't Throw Away the Ugly Carrot

About 30 per cent of produce in North America does not make it to market simply because of the way it looks. The cost of food is expected to rise by almost 4 per cent over the next year, and by denying perfectly good fruits and vegetables access to store shelves, we are merely helping to steer food prices higher and higher. The time is now to stop this wasteful behaviour.
12/07/2012 05:29 EST
AP

This Thanksgiving, Consider Those Who Are Hungry in Canada

We are one day away from the Thanksgiving long weekend. For many Canadian families this is all about gathering around a dinner table, laden with delicious vegetables, succulent turkeys and elaborate pastries. However, this Thanksgiving weekend, thousands of Canadians will go hungry.
10/06/2012 08:19 EDT
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A Bad Harvest Season Means Higher Food Prices in Ontario

The irregular weather conditions most of Ontario has been experiencing over the past few months have set the province up for a particularly challenging harvest season. Some of the farms we talked to were not even sure if they would be opening to the public this season because it has been such a hard year. So what does this mean for Ontario? As a result of this spring and summer's hectic weather, experts are expecting to see food prices rise by 4 per cent across Canada in 2013.
08/30/2012 06:59 EDT