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Samuel Getachew

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Samuel Getachew is a resident of Toronto and is a regular contributor to TZTA, Generation Next and Leaders & Legacies (among others). He is the recipient of the City of Toronto's William P. Hubbard Award for Equity and Human Rights and was chosen by the Toronto Star as 'Person to Watch' in 2014.
CP

Say "À Bientôt" Not "Au Revoir" to Jean Charest

The loss for the Quebec Liberals and its leader, Jean Charest, was a political low moment last night. Indeed it is my hope that Jean Charest will still be involved in public life. His undying affection for federalism, conviction for equality and eloquence is still a service needed by Quebec and Canada.
09/05/2012 01:05 EDT
Getty

Not Excited About Obama Anymore? Remember What He's Done

At this year's Republican National Convention, Mitt Romney asked America what it means that they are less excited for Obama as a president than they were as a candidate. But that's not relevant for America's very first black President who has achieved free health care for Americans, brought relative peace in the world and gave diversity a new meaning in American public service.
08/31/2012 05:28 EDT
CP

Why Christy Clark's Team Is Jumping Ship

Earlier today, B.C.'s young Finance Minister and Deputy Premier, Kevin Falcon, resigned both positions effective immediately. In recent weeks, many MLAs have announed their resignations. The fact is that Christy Clark's leadership style and lack of clarity has made her irrelevant and incompetent at best.
08/29/2012 05:15 EDT
CP

Time For Horwath to Shed The Overalls?

According to a new poll, the Ontario NDP and its leader, Andrea Horwath, are falling far behind to third place. For Horwath, who has been addressing business friendly crowds in recent weeks, the polls reflect a struggle within the ranks of her members in the direction of the union-inspired party. Should the party maintain its controversial and stubborn perspectives on public issues or should it modernize itself?
08/24/2012 12:32 EDT
CP

Talking to Jack Layton was Like Talking to Canada Itself

Jack Layton is one the Canadian politician I respected most, yet never had a chance to support. I first met him at a charity event where he wrote out his private cell phone number. He asked me to call him anytime I wanted so we could have a conversation. I often felt like I was talking to Canada itself.
08/22/2012 05:02 EDT
SRC

Rob Ford, Get a Driver ASAP

Earlier Tuesday, Toronto Mayor Rob Ford was caught by a member of the public while he was reading and driving on the Gardiner Expressway. Last year, there was also another accusation of the mayor driving while talking on the phone. The mayor should accept a publicly paid driver immediately and if his focus is still to save and advocate for the taxpayer -- he should live his words and even consider paying for it himself.
08/15/2012 12:09 EDT

The Former Bay Street Lawyer Devoted to Change

Bruce Alexander is helping create a movement of new Canadians to have a huge impact in the Canada of tomorrow. For the last several decades, the 74-year-old former Bay street lawyer has mentored a slew of new Canadian women change their lives and the lives of their communities through the power of an education.
08/03/2012 07:47 EDT

Why Jean Charest Should Stay

Earlier today, Premier Jean Charest walked to the mansion of Lt. Gov. Pierre Duchesene to dissolve his government and call an election on September 4. The vision of Jean Charest is best -- not just for Quebec but for Canada. He is the dean of Canada's surviving distinct (Progressive) Conservative tradition that has built Canada over the years.
08/01/2012 03:03 EDT

Ford's Tea Party-Like Solutions to Toronto Violence

Earlier today, an identified man was discovered in a school playground and pronounced dead from gunshot wounds. The latest killing was Toronto's 30th homicide of the year. In a desperate city that is looking for answers, its mayor, Rob Ford, and member of the mayor's executive committee, Councillor Michael Thompson, offer unusual Tea Party-like simple solutions to a complex made in Canada problem.
07/19/2012 05:32 EDT
CP

Carleton's About Face to Preston Manning: We Don't Want Tory-Dictated Money

A month ago, Ottawa's Carleton University agreed to accept $15 million from a private citizen for a new graduate program. The money came from the personal fortune of an Albertan philanthropist, Clayton H. Riddell, while the idea originated from one of Canada's elder statesman -- former federal Reform party leader, Preston Manning. Now the university has released a statement -- one which suddenly rejects the deal.
07/15/2012 11:59 EDT
CP

How Bev Oda Destroyed Canada's Foreign Aid Reputation

To Canadian taxpayers, the 67-year old and first Japanese Canadian MP who has just resigned will always be known as the Minister who charged the government $16 for an orange juice at an international health conference for the poor. Under her watch, many counties have had their Canadian (foreign) aid cut or reduced at best. What she may have been successful destroying is a great Canadian brand in the process.
07/03/2012 05:35 EDT
11 Alive

Getachew Gets a Bite of a Rhodes Scholar's Noodle

In 2007, Kofi Hope was made a Rhodes Scholar. This year, he returned to Toronto with a newly minted PhD from Oxford. He reflects on the latest tragedy at the Eaton Centre as well as looks at potential solutions to help curb what is becoming an often occurrence in the GTA.
07/03/2012 04:26 EDT
Shutterstock

A Canadian Life Spent on Couches Around the World

Maskarm K. Haile has called the world her "open university." She has traveled the world fulfilling a childhood dream of discovering something "that is bigger than life itself." She experienced the world by traveling as a "couch-surfer." She has discovered that most foreign strangers are no different from the neighbours that are often found in her diverse and multicultural Montreal neighborhood.
07/01/2012 12:07 EDT

It's About Time American Health Care Caught Up With Canada

In Canada, it has been part of our tradition and law for close to 50 years. The great universal medicare is still a great Canadian bipartisan jewel achieved a long time ago. Looking at what happened in the United States today, I am just surprised it took Americans this long to catch up to us.
06/28/2012 05:52 EDT
AP

Why I Love Canada: An Immigrant's Perspective

Canada Day is a time to celebrate a great Canadian citizenship. For immigrants such as myself, it gives us a rare chance to celebrate great milestones. For instance, Jemy Joseph has only been in Canada just over a decade but she has achieved more than her share. As a medical student, she's a shining example of what immigrants contribute to the fabric of Canada's identity.
06/27/2012 10:51 EDT
AP

Patrick Brazeau: Not the First Nor Last Lazy Senator

Senator Patrick Brazeau took to Twitter to insult a Canadian Press journalist after she published a story highlighting his lack of attendant in the senate. In the 1990s, the Conservative Party promised to reform the Senate while the NDP promised to abolish it all together if they ever formed future Canadian governments. Since those days, very little reform has taken place.
06/26/2012 08:43 EDT
Alamy

By Taking Away Refugee Benefits, Canada Is Taking Away Its Traditions

Just over a decade ago, the UN declared June 20th as World Refugee Day. But in Canada today, we are losing our noble traditions of welcoming refugees and giving them full benefits. Thankfully, there are organizations like the Canada Centre for Victims of Torture that are trying to help out these immigrants in any way they can.
06/23/2012 11:28 EDT
PC

Liberal Party Ain't Sitting Pretty in the Polls

If an election was held today, according to a new poll, the Ontario Liberals would be reduced to third party status while the surging NDP would be an official opposition. Barely a year after forming a historic third term in office, the Liberals, have been reduced to 28 per cent of support according to the poll. That may leave the Liberals on the outside looking in.
06/13/2012 02:07 EDT
CP

A Refugee's Thoughts on the Eaton Centre Shooting

In the summer of 2005 -- dubbed by media "the summer of the gun" -- a delegation was chosen to meet with then prime minister Paul Martin. There was an urgent need to address and eradicate gun violence. Among the leaders chosen to meet with Martin was a one-time refugee from Eritrea.
06/07/2012 12:01 EDT