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Tim Knight

Writer, Comunications Coach, Broadcast Journalism Trainer, Filmmaker

As a British-Canadian, I’m expected to be self-deprecating, unpretentious, even modest.



Read my regular media column, WATCHING THE WATCHDOG, here on Huffington Post Canada however, and you’ll find that I exhibit few of those virtues when it comes to my skills as a writer, communications coach and broadcast journalism trainer.



What you’ll find instead is that I’m a first class writer who's also one of the best communications coaches and broadcast journalism trainers around.


I know my stuff.


AS A WRITER, I can handle just about any style (except jargon, bafflegab and bureaucratese) and any subject (except quantum mathematics and how Xi Jinping became General Secretary of the Communist Party of China). 



I specialize in storytelling. In writing with clarity, intelligence, verve and even wit. In taking the complex and making it simple. In clarifying information and bringing understanding.



AS A COMMUNICATIONS COACH, I can help you write better, sharper, more effective papers and speeches and deliver those speeches convincingly, with panache confidence and conviction.



AS A BROADCAST JOURNALISM TRAINER, I’ve worked with thousands of broadcast journalists in hundreds of workshops in a dozen countries. I have no doubt I can seriously polish your storytelling, writing, performing and interviewing skills.

All at very reasonable prices.



In fact, I’m so confident that I can help make you a better writer, speechmaker, interviewee or broadcast journalist that I offer this GUARANTEE: if you’re not entirely satisfied, I’ll refund half your fee — as long as you buy the beer afterwards.


So refresh your skills. Have an experienced, discreet eye and ear check out what you’re doing and help you do it a lot better.




Find out who I think I am at my WEBSITE www.TimKnight.org
My HuffPost COLUMNS
Linkedin PROFESSIONAL SUMMARY

SPECIALTIES: Coaching in storytelling, writing, interviewing, performing for broadcast journalists and anyone who wants to write, make speeches or be interviewed professionally. Documentary producing, directing, writing, narrating, story editing.
AP

Watching the Watchdog: Three Scary Truths About Canadian Democracy

The Toronto-based charity, Samara, has a commitment to examining how our political system works. And to do that, it "seeds ideas for relevant and responsive politics that Canadians can believe in." This all sounds very polite. In actual fact, however, Samara is a major shit disturber
12/03/2012 12:13 EST
AP

Watching the Watchdog: 2012, the Deadliest Year for Journalists

Did you know that around the world, 119 journalists have died in the line of duty this year? The worst year ever. Did you know that a journalist is deliberately killed somewhere in the world every eight days? This is the norm, the way it is, in our honourable craft today. And the job's getting ever more dangerous.
11/28/2012 05:47 EST
WVII

Watching the Watchdog: The Great Firewall of Journalism

I've got two new heroes. Their names are Cindy Michaels and Tony Consiglio. Until last Tuesday they were the top journalists and news anchors at a small TV station in Bangor, Maine. Then they quit. On air. So why are a couple of on-air anchor resignations enough for me or anyone else to add their names to the pantheon of journalistic heroes? It's because of the firewall these two respected -- and paid for with their jobs.
11/23/2012 05:14 EST
Flickr: espensorvik

Watching the Watchdog: Don't Mess With Mesley

You wouldn't ever want to answer your front door to find Wendy Mesley holding a microphone there -- right next to a CBC camera flashing its little red light. Last Sunday, some of the old pre-perky Mesley came back. The following is the last part of of Mesley's interview with Jacques Duchesneau, the former Montreal police chief.
11/20/2012 05:22 EST
PA

Watching the Watchdog: An Election Day Fable

During those four years there had been much sadness, wailing and gnashing of teeth and beating of breasts in the land as the tribe's riches and power ebbed, and the people lost faith in their tribe. So therefore, many leaders did arise who did each say unto the people that he alone was strong and of good courage and should be their leader to lead them out of the slough of despond and into the land of milk and honey...
11/07/2012 12:17 EST
AP

Watching the Watchdog: What Happens if Obama Loses?

When it came to colour and discrimination on account of colour, Obama's election four years ago was a much-needed opportunity to heal the soul of his troubled nation. With a black man in the White House, old scars left by slavery could finally mend. What will happen if he loses?
11/05/2012 05:47 EST
CBC

Watching the Watchdog: Reimagining the CBC

Recently, I was invited to a happening, an evening "of celebration, comedy, music, and discussion with expert panellists" organized by an obviously worthy volunteer group called Reimagine CBC. Seems Reimagine CBC and another volunteer group have just finished a survey of some 11,000 Canadians aimed at finding out what we, the citizens, want of our CBC.
11/02/2012 05:56 EDT

Watching the Watchdog: Conrad Black and the Art of the Interview

Conrad Black was once the world's third biggest newspaper magnate. Then he lost his newspapers and spent three years in an American prison for fraud and obstruction of justice. During that time he wrote a book, A Matter of Principle. Now he's in England flogging the book. Highlight so far is his interview on the BBC TV program Newsnight with acerbic host Jeremy Paxman. Talk about a clash of egos.
10/26/2012 05:30 EDT
Capture d'écran

Watching the Watchdog: The Elephant in the Newsroom

Last Thursday, CJF's full-house gathering was titled Gutenberg's Last Stand: Reinventing the Modern Newspaper. Sitting in the audience, I was certain that -- plagiarism being a mortal sin in our honourable profession -- someone would raise Wentegate. I waited. Nobody mentioned Wentegate. Or resignations. Surely, if nothing else, Stackhouse deserved his chance to explain?
10/23/2012 05:20 EDT

Watching the Watchdog: Jimmy Breslin, I Salute You

A man I taught to write for TV wins a Pulitzer Prize a while back. This man wins the Pulitzer because be writes about ordinary women and men -- people like you and me -- as if we are the most important people in all the world. The man's name is Jimmy Breslin. He writes a column for the New York Daily News and is all of 82 years old this week.
10/19/2012 05:38 EDT
AP

Watching the Watchdog: Last Night Obama Got His Mojo Back

During his first debate with Mitt Romney, Barack Obama seldom looked directly at Romney. He seldom contradicted Romney. He never raised his voice to Romney. He never really challenged Romney. So what happens in the second U.S. presidential debate? OBAMA GETS HIS MOJO BACK!!! He came out bristling for a fight. This time Obama's in charge. He dominates the fight, provides the drive, the passion. This time, no deference.
10/17/2012 08:03 EDT
Alamy

The EU Won the Nobel Peace Prize, Fair and Square

Right now, Europe is having serious economic and social problems. But that's no reason to challenge the award of the Nobel Peace prize to the European Union. When it comes to handing out peace prizes, you can't ask for a lot more than traditional enemies beating their swords into ploughshares. And lions lying down with lambs. This Peace Prize is truly well-deserved.
10/15/2012 12:24 EDT

Watching the Watchdog: The Freedom of Speech Award Goes to...

So there I am in my last column agonizing over whether Canada should ban that obscene and hateful Internet video called Innocence of Muslims, when it occurs to me that it might be a really good idea to come up with an example of freedom of speech in action. Something easily understandable. Something vivid. Something gutsy.
10/11/2012 05:17 EDT
AP

Watching the Watchdog: Why Censorship Is Never the Answer

The subject matter and plot of Innocence of Muslims are an abomination, deeply offensive to people who really, really don't need to be offended any more, particularly during this delicate time in their history. But I believe absolutely in my right to be offended. Which is the reason I simply can't propose that we lessen our democracies by banning any writings and films offensive to Muslims or any other religious folk.
10/08/2012 12:12 EDT
AP

Watching the Watchdog: Ode to a New York Times Legend

Most newspaper journalists aren't overly-fond of their publishers. Arthur "Punch" Sulzberger who was publisher of the estimable New York Times was always a splendid exception. In fact, he put his own freedom, and his newspaper's very existence, on the line because he believed absolutely in the public's right to know. Punch Sulzberger died Saturday and got a send-off few publishers anywhere have ever earned.
10/02/2012 05:10 EDT

Watching the Watchdog: The Globe Put Itself Before Readers

Margaret Wente, award-winning three-times-a-week columnist at the Globe and Mail is accused in the blog Media Culpa of serial plagiarism. Seems she's been exceeding sloppy in attributing sources which is a journalistic sin. It's clear to me that all three Globe journalists put their own interests and the interests of their employer before the interests of the people, their readers.
09/28/2012 11:17 EDT

For the Royals, Kate Topless Is Child's Play

This family's privacy has survived a princely pater familias reputed to have enjoyed rather frequent romps with ladies who were neither his sovereign nor his wife and a promiscuous princess married to the heir to the throne among other things. After such a history, a little blurry bare breastedness, shot from a great distance, really shouldn't qualify to right-thinking people as either "grotesque" or "totally unjustifiable."
09/19/2012 05:23 EDT
Alamy

Watching the Watchdog: 50 Years of Journalism & It's all the Same

Once upon a time I wrote a book about being a journalist in the 21st century. I was leafing through its pages last evening, when I stopped at the chapter The Less Things Change... It's about my time, 50 years ago, working as reporter/anchor at a startup TV station in Zambia. The chapter starts by describing how we got our foreign news film back there in the 60s. Even after all these years, much is still the same.
09/14/2012 05:30 EDT
AP

Watching the Watchdog: Why Obama's Speech Fell Flat

By most standards, Obama's speech at the Democratic National Convention was an excellent speech. It's in the delivery where it falls down. That's because the man who speaks these lines isn't really believing them any more. Instead, this decent man, one of the world's great orators seems tired, frustrated, unfulfilled, too often irritated.
09/09/2012 09:45 EDT