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Tim Knight

Writer, Comunications Coach, Broadcast Journalism Trainer, Filmmaker

As a British-Canadian, I’m expected to be self-deprecating, unpretentious, even modest.



Read my regular media column, WATCHING THE WATCHDOG, here on Huffington Post Canada however, and you’ll find that I exhibit few of those virtues when it comes to my skills as a writer, communications coach and broadcast journalism trainer.



What you’ll find instead is that I’m a first class writer who's also one of the best communications coaches and broadcast journalism trainers around.


I know my stuff.


AS A WRITER, I can handle just about any style (except jargon, bafflegab and bureaucratese) and any subject (except quantum mathematics and how Xi Jinping became General Secretary of the Communist Party of China). 



I specialize in storytelling. In writing with clarity, intelligence, verve and even wit. In taking the complex and making it simple. In clarifying information and bringing understanding.



AS A COMMUNICATIONS COACH, I can help you write better, sharper, more effective papers and speeches and deliver those speeches convincingly, with panache confidence and conviction.



AS A BROADCAST JOURNALISM TRAINER, I’ve worked with thousands of broadcast journalists in hundreds of workshops in a dozen countries. I have no doubt I can seriously polish your storytelling, writing, performing and interviewing skills.

All at very reasonable prices.



In fact, I’m so confident that I can help make you a better writer, speechmaker, interviewee or broadcast journalist that I offer this GUARANTEE: if you’re not entirely satisfied, I’ll refund half your fee — as long as you buy the beer afterwards.


So refresh your skills. Have an experienced, discreet eye and ear check out what you’re doing and help you do it a lot better.




Find out who I think I am at my WEBSITE www.TimKnight.org
My HuffPost COLUMNS
Linkedin PROFESSIONAL SUMMARY

SPECIALTIES: Coaching in storytelling, writing, interviewing, performing for broadcast journalists and anyone who wants to write, make speeches or be interviewed professionally. Documentary producing, directing, writing, narrating, story editing.

Watching the Watchdog: Saving Canadian Journalism From Itself

Slowly, slowly, the dwindling band of journalists who survive all the cuts are being acclimatized to the notion that their job is no longer to serve the people in our democracy -- a tradition proudly built up over the past couple of hundred years, often at great cost -- but to serve their employer. So why don't we, the people, take over -- subsidize our precious democratic journalism ourselves? Here's the plan.
08/29/2012 12:20 EDT
AP

We've Seen Violence Like the Massacre at Marikana Before

Sixteen years after freedom and the end of the evil that was apartheid, South African police massacred 34 striking black miners at a place called Marikana. Pictures on TV and in our newspapers show them chasing demonstrators, firing into the crowd, standing over the dead like hunters counting their kill.
08/24/2012 05:04 EDT
AP

Watching the Watchdog: My 2012 Olympic Coverage Report Card

Even before the Games began, it seemed Bell and Rogers decided to stick with selling cellphones and they aren't interested in the next Olympics (which have gone to CBC). Now, the viewing numbers are excellent of course. But they're no more than a rather dubious measurement of eyes in front of TV sets, computers and various gadgets. They're not indications of satisfaction. Or dissatisfaction. For the record though, here are some things in CTV's evening prime time coverage that certainly could have been done better...
08/17/2012 05:37 EDT
AP

Watching The Watchdog: "O" Stands For Olympics And Orwellian

Ye gads, is there no end to the massive abuse of power and privilege that is the Olympics? The following is a list of some of the words and phrases only official Games sponsors are allowed to use: "Olympic. Olympian. Olympiad. Paralympic. Paralympian. Paralympiad. Also their plurals, translations and anything similar to them."
08/10/2012 05:29 EDT
AFP

When Jamaica Wins, It Means Sweet Revenge

In two days, three Jamaicans won medals in sprinting. These victories mean a lot more to the country than deciding who can run fastest while stripped down to underwear. There's a marvelous symbolism involved. Even, perhaps, revenge. For almost three hundred years Jamaica was more or less owned by the British and ruled from London.
08/07/2012 08:36 EDT

Watching the Watchdog: The Opening Ceremony Was Its Own Weird Word Cloud

The opening stuff before the parade of athletes was weird, bizarre, peculiar, odd, curious, offbeat, outlandish, eccentric, unconventional, unorthodox, queer, unexpected, abnormal, atypical, unusual, out of the ordinary, extraordinary, remarkable, puzzling, mystifying, mysterious, perplexing, baffling, inexplicable, incongruous, irregular, singular, ludicrous, comical, ridiculous, droll, deviant, aberrant, grotesque, freakish, surreal, wacky, oddball, way out, freaky, off the wall, rum, wacko, and bizarro.
07/27/2012 10:28 EDT
AP

Watching the Watchdog: Inside a War Correspondent's Head

In this edition of One On One, Mansbridge does a competent job debriefing the distinguished CBC foreign correspondent Susan Ormiston, back in London after her latest foreign assignment. So why do journalists like Susan Ormiston volunteer to go to all these places where people kill each other, and too often kill journalists who might as well have targets painted on their flak jackets?
07/17/2012 12:38 EDT

Watching the Watchdog: How Are Canada's News Anchors Faring?

There's a thread running through today's news broadcasting -- that to one extent or another, the big three of Canadian TV news are captives of the teleprompters which sits in front of their cameras and shows them the words they're paid a lot of money to read at us. Here's a summer report card of how they're doing.
07/13/2012 05:20 EDT

Watching the Watchdog: Report Card on Global -- Two Years Later

If there's one rule every one of the scores of broadcast journalists I've ever coached -- in Canada or overseas -- agrees with (at least in theory) it's this: the best broadcaster talks to one person, and only one person, at a time. And shares information with that person. Here some ideas on anchoring.
07/06/2012 05:01 EDT

Watching the Watchdog: The Organization Fighting "Isms" in the Media

Innoversity is a not-for-profit organization that has spent the past 13 years struggling with some success "to create opportunities for cultural minority, Aboriginal and disabled Canadians to actively engage with, and be reflected within, key social sectors and institutions." That's institution-speak for fighting racism and all the other isms that still stain our society, particularly our media.
07/03/2012 04:29 EDT
CP

Watching the Watchdog: The Final Dispatch from "Dispatches"

Over these past twelve years, MacInnes-Rae has proved with Dispatches that the ancient art of storytelling didn't die with Seven Days. And that for broadcasters, traditional storytelling is still by far the best, most efficient and effective way to pass on information, one person to another.
06/29/2012 05:46 EDT

Watching the Watchdog: Stats Don't Lie, Political News Falls Short

Seems that when you spend an hour watching Canadian TV news stories about politics, you get only about 15 minutes of real information. These scary numbers come from the highly respected charitable Samara Institute today. Samara has spent months doing all the research, the number crunching, and the drawing of conclusions. Will the newsrooms listen? Probably not.
06/27/2012 12:03 EDT

Watching the Watchdog: Maclean's Misses the Mark

You'd have thought Maclean's would have blazoned the death of Section 13 all over its front cover. With a massive headline along the lines of "SCREW YOU, CENSORS!!!" Or "WE WON!!!" Instead, the cover featured a generic picture of an innocuous youngish woman and an innocuous youngish man grinning maniacally and the silly headline: "The majority of us are singles. So why do we still live in a couples world?"
06/25/2012 12:15 EDT
AP

Old Habits Die Hard

Last year, victims of priestly abuse represented by the U.S.-based Centre for Constitutional Rights made a formal complaint to the International Criminal Court, accusing the pope and three of his top prelates of crimes against humanity. And Ratzinger claims this is all a "mystery"?
06/21/2012 03:23 EDT
Getty Images

Watching the Watchdog: Notes From The Future of Journalism

These are my very own, real leaked documents about the fact that traditional, general-interest journalism is the crucial cornerstone of democracy and that social media threatens to destroy that cornerstone. They're written by students studying journalism. If you have any interest in Canadian journalism in our Canadian democracy you should read them.
06/18/2012 01:23 EDT