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Busting Gender Stereotypes Can Benefit Men In Life And Career

01/04/2017 02:11 EST | Updated 01/04/2017 02:19 EST
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Real life businesspeople shot on location. Since these locations are the real thing, and not shot in an 'office studio', high ISO levels are sometimes needed to catch the moment. The ISO range is between 250-600 so it should be fine for most usage cases. Most people won't notice anything really, but if you are a nerd like us, you can see a little noise.

The recently released film Arrival casts Amy Adams as Louise Banks, a linguistics expert who must translate sounds emanating from heptapods (seven-limbed aliens) who have landed on earth. Recruited by the American government, Banks is tasked with finding out what they are doing on Earth.

Unarmed, she bravely removes her hazmat protection and, through facial expression, the inflection in her voice and listening, she manages to communicate with the aliens, preventing war with the nations of Earth.

Demonstrating both empathy and fearlessness, Adams convincingly offers up a poignant view of the strengths and foibles of humanity. Her ability to establish a connection is a wonderful demonstration of the value of Feminine Energy, and with strategic courage, she heroically depicts the value of Masculine Energy. It's a great reminder of the importance of incorporating both energies into our repertoire.

They can embrace skills, talents and passions irrespective of gender, which benefits individuals, corporations and the world.

The case for shifting between energies (utilizing the positive characteristics of both genders) has made huge strides in the last few years. People are realizing that, without the weight of gendered expectations, they can embrace skills, talents and passions irrespective of gender, which benefits individuals, corporations and the world. Feminist, journalist and activist Gloria Steinem calls this "developing the full circle of ourselves".

It is a long way from where we once were, labelled "pink" or "blue" at birth and put into our gender-specific boxes with their predicted (and limiting) gender-specific behaviours.

woman boss speaking

Women taught to avoid risk are reluctant to access their masculine traits and volunteer for stretch assignments, thus missing opportunities to be seen as leaders. Meanwhile, men discouraged from the display of feminine traits avoid feeling their own feelings and have difficulty relating to the emotions of others, the basis of all meaningful relationships.

Clearly, both lose.

Growing up, I realized that life was like a game of snakes and ladders -- rife with the cultural rules inflicted upon us. Due to socialization, girls are given more permission to shift between the gender energies, while the gender role transgressions of boys are viewed in a negative light.

Globalism requires innovation, service-orientation and communication skills, all stereotypical feminine qualities.

As a girl child, I quickly observed that I could be accepted, even encouraged, for being a tomboy; using masculine attributes elevated and helped me to climb the ladder in the game of life. Conversely, boy children were denigrated for exploring feminine pastimes; they were teased, ridiculed and punished by peers, parents,and teachers.

Adopting feminine attributes diminished their credibility. They rode a big snake downward. No wonder some boys become men who avoided all things feminine.

This early indoctrination continues to their detriment today. Globalism requires innovation, service-orientation and communication skills, all stereotypical feminine qualities which many men have been taught are weak and less-than. Overcoming their attachment to traditional masculinity will not only help their personal lives, it is critical for the advancement of their careers as well.

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