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Cathy Kangas

Member, Board of Directors, Humane Society

Cathy is a member of the Board of Directors of the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS); the largest animal protection organization in the world. In December 2012, she received the HSUS “Compassion in Action” award. She has worked tirelessly saving retired racehorses, ending the slaughter of baby seals in Canada, reuniting soldiers with the dogs they befriended in Afghanistan, and building a shelter for stray dogs in St. Martin. Cathy believes it is important to defend the defenseless and give a voice to those who have none.



She is the Founder and CEO of PRAI Beauty, a global skincare line sold on home shopping networks around the world. Through “Beauty with a Cause,” she uses a portion of the proceeds from PRAI Beauty to help animal welfare organizations.



Born in the UK, Cathy began her career working at the world-famous Selfridges Department Store in London while attending college. She came to the United States in 1983 with Revlon, held management and marketing roles for this luxury brand, and then served as the National Director of Sales Training for Cartier.



In 1999, Cathy founded and launched PRAI Beauty Group, Inc. What sets her highly successful PRAI skincare products apart is their unique and exclusive PRAI Root Essence: the botanical extract which has been used for thousands of years by the royal families of Thailand. The combination of this key botanical with the latest skincare ingredients and delivery technologies, has promoted her and her award-winning products to leading positions on home shopping television networks in the US (HSN), the UK (QVC), Australia (TVSN), Canada (The Shopping Network) and Italy (QVC). It is very important to Cathy that none of PRAI Beauty’s products is tested on animals.



Cathy lives in New Canaan, CT, with her husband Ed, the former Global Chairman and CEO of Deloitte, and their four rescued dogs.
AP

The Canadian Government Should Ban Seal Hunting, Not Make it Easier

I have been in touch with Canadian fishermen who no longer want to endure the dangerous conditions of the hunt and would like their government to consider a buy back of their licenses. However, the Canadian government refuses to buy out the industry, instead choosing to heavily subsidize the seal hunt.
10/15/2013 05:51 EDT