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Darryl Konynenbelt

Media coach, proud papa of triplets, husband, news-centric, creatively cynical, wanderlusts, thrill-seeker, ski-fan, Gen X-er

Darryl Konynenbelt is a Brand Journalist who now media coaches senior executives and individuals on current events, public affairs and crisis management.
His career has spanned more than 20 years as a former TV journalist at bureaus across Canada. He has received industry accolades for live breaking news & investigative journalism in national politics, land claims issues, NAFTA, corporate takeovers, as well as security intelligence stories including the terror trial of the Toronto 18. On the international front he has stared down high profile humanitarian disasters in Sri Lanka and Thailand, covering the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and famine in East Africa.
Darryl is Navigator Ltd.'s Media Lead, and now helps people and corporations craft their story.
Digital Vision. via Getty Images

Donald Trump, The Pronoun Politician

Pronouns replace nouns, and are used to avoid cumbersome language in a sentence. In public speaking, these shorter words can wield power. They are inclusive and draw the audience or listener into feeling like they matter. As someone who for a living advises business executives on body language and media fluency, I am intrigued by how Donald Trump and/or his writers have mastered this.
06/28/2016 12:31 EDT
Shutterstock

Hey Media, #BathrobeGuy Deserves Privacy

The reality is that everyone now has a camera and the potential to produce knee-jerk content. If journalists are to be bound by the ethics that govern their news gathering techniques, it is equally paramount the public inform themselves of the new realities of subterfuge that may greet them at every turn even in private.
08/27/2015 05:31 EDT
ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Rise of Social Media Was Brian Williams' Downfall

What trends on social media determines what makes the headlines by mass news media now, not the reverse. The change in the delivery of news forces us all to do what good authentic journalists already do and that's ask questions, ask questions and ask more questions until you are certain the story is right.
02/12/2015 12:57 EST