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Jean Paul Gladu

President and CEO, Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business

Jean Paul (JP) Gladu is currently the President and CEO of the Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business (CCAB) based in Toronto. Anishinaabe from Thunder Bay JP is a member of the Sand Point First Nation located on the eastern shores of Lake Nipigon.

Mr. Gladu has over two decades of experience in the natural resource sector. His career path includes work with Aboriginal communities and organizations, environmental non-government organizations, industry and governments from across Canada. He has produced a number of publications related to Aboriginal issues including: forest certification, Native values collection, biofuel opportunities, First Nation community land use plans, criteria and indicators for sustainable forestry, and cedar product development.
With a passion for his community, his culture and traditions Mr. Gladu brings the past, present and future to the table, moving corporate Canada and Aboriginal business toward sustainable partnerships and shared economic prosperity.
An experienced negotiator JP led a number of business development projects in northern Ontario. JP completed a forestry technician diploma in 1993 and obtained an undergraduate degree in forestry from Northern Arizona University in 2000. He also holds an Executive MBA from Queens University.
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Closing the Gap Between Aboriginal Business Leaders and Corporate Canada

Last week, we hosted the first of two joint Summits in Vancouver between our organizations, The Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business (CCAB) and The Canadian Board Diversity Council (CBDC). Both Summits focus on board governance, kick starting a critical national dialogue about the merits of strengthening these communication lines between Corporate Canada and aboriginal business leaders.
05/07/2015 12:54 EDT
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Today's Aboriginal Businesses Are Breaking Free of Old Boundaries

Aboriginal people have largely been excluded from Canada's business community since the fur trade. So it's that much more incredible to see the re-birth of our peoples' entrepreneurial spirit in the past quarter century. Not only are our aboriginal businesses expected to contribute $13 Billion to Canada's GDP by 2016, but we see business looking beyond the Canadian borders to expand their growing business sphere.
11/12/2014 06:02 EST
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Aboriginal Entrepreneurs: The Under-Reported Story of This Generation

It's important to note that Aboriginal people were excluded from participating in the economy for much of Canadian history. To state that not being able to leave the reservation so to speak was a hindrance to doing business is the understatement of the century. Many Canadians don't realize that in a very short period of time the explosion of Aboriginal business in Canada is the most under-reported good news story in a generation. It's important to note that Aboriginal Peoples were excluded from participating in the economy for much of Canadian history. To state that not being able to leave the reservation so to speak was a hindrance to doing business is the understatement of the century.
12/19/2013 05:35 EST