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Monia Mazigh

Academic, author and human rights advocate

Monia Mazigh is an academic, author and human rights advocate. Mazigh was born and raised in Tunisia and immigrated to Canada in 1991. Mazigh was catapulted onto the public stage in 2002 when her husband, Maher Arar, was deported to Syria where he was tortured and held without charge for over a year. She campaigned tirelessly for his release. Mazigh holds a PhD in finance from McGill University. In 2008, she published a memoir about her pursuit of justice, Hope and Despair, shortlisted for the Ottawa Book Award. In 2014, she published her first novel Mirrors and Mirages. It was short listed for the Book Trillium Award and for the Ottawa Book Award. Her second novel, Hope has two daughters will be published in January 2017 by Anansi House.
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Omar Khadr's Case A Black Stamp On Canada's Human Rights Record

Internationally, Canada is portraying itself as an open country, accepting refugees from war ravaged countries like Syria. However, amidst this atmosphere, there is a dark cloud that keeps the rays of the sun from reaching everyone.It is time for the Canadian government to act swiftly and let the sun shine on Omar Khadr's life.
04/12/2017 05:08 EDT
CP

Canadian Politicians Need To Stand Up Against Growing Xenophobia

The world is changing rapidly. We have witnessed the success of the Brexit campaign in the UK, and the victory of Donald Trump in the U.S. Amid the social and political turmoil, some political groups and social movements are emerging to exploit this climate of tension and fear and make political and financial gains out of it. Canada has not been immune of this.
12/06/2016 01:38 EST
CP

These Studies Shouldn't Be Used To Avoid The Issue Of Racial Profiling

News last week about the two-year study of the traffic stop data collected by the Ottawa Police were quickly dismissed by the same researchers who conducted it, as "not necessarily indicative of causation, and it doesn't prove racial profiling." So what is the point of conducting such a study if those results cannot be used to speak about racial profiling, admit its existence and thus dealing with it?
11/02/2016 04:08 EDT
John Woods/CP

American Involvement In Canadian Terror Cases Must Be Questioned

Aaron Driver died in obscure and tragic circumstances, and we may never know what really happened to him. Nevertheless, asking questions and demanding answers can help us to learn from the past and move forward. Linking the case of Aaron Driver to the question of radicalization is a simplistic and misleading narrative. Demanding answers about the FBI's role in his death, however, is more crucial than ever.
08/16/2016 05:54 EDT
Adam Mooz Photography/Flickr

Do We Have A Pattern Of Police Entrapment In Canada?

Last week, Justice Catherine Bruce, a judge from British Columbia, made history in Canada and in North America in general. She ruled that John Nutall and Amanda Korody, two Canadian convicted on terrorism charges, were instead entrapped by the RCMP. The unusual factor here isn't that entrapment was used, but the decision of the judge to accept it as one.
08/03/2016 05:23 EDT
CP

CSIS Perpetuates A Culture Of Fear With Unannounced Visits

With additional extraordinary powers granted to CSIS since the passing of Bill C51, one only can wonder whether these visits are becoming the norm rather than the exceptions. The disruption powers included in Bill C-51 allow CSIS to seize documents or computers, enter people's properties, spy on them without a judicial warrant.
07/05/2016 02:16 EDT
CP

Counterterrorism Plans Won't Be Effective Until Biases Are Addressed

Last federal budget, the government announced the plan to create a counter terrorism office. This new initiative named as the Office of the Community Outreach and Counter-radicalization Co-ordinator would cost Canadian taxpayers $35 millions dollars. With an initial funding of $3 million in 2016-2017 and a $10 million a year in the subsequent years.
06/09/2016 11:50 EDT
Shutterstock / sakhorn

Canada Must Finally Take A Stand Against Torture

The Canadian Foreign Affairs Minister, Stéphane Dion, recently declared that Canada "should join this important protocol" -- the United Nations' Protocol against Torture. More than a decade after it was initially passed, Canada is still sitting on the bench and watching cases after cases of torture happening.
05/04/2016 12:24 EDT
Rolf Hicker via Getty Images

We Must Question The Timing Of This Terrorism Case

Immediately, after the Brussels attacks, an engineering student from the University of Waterloo was arrested by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP). Even if the Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale went out publicly and declared that Canada isn't under any additional or specific terrorist threats, the RCMP decided to choose to arrest the suspect during a time of fear.
03/31/2016 11:18 EDT
Rene Johnston via Getty Images

Canada Is Fighting Terrorism With More Racial Profiling

Immediately, after 9/11 attacks, the Arab and Muslim communities started receiving the "visits" of RCMP officers and CSIS agents asking them about their opinions on the Middle-East, about their religious beliefs, about their friends and what they know about them. Some of these "visits" were conducted at the workplace. At that time, no body spoke about radicalization, as if it was assumed that the targeted individuals came to Canada already "radicalized." The Muslim community was perceived on the "bad" side of the fight. They were always considered as not doing enough.
03/23/2016 03:57 EDT