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Mubin Shaikh

Former counter terrorism operative

Mubin Shaikh was born and raised in Canada and spent his childhood years as an Army Cadet for 5 years. At 19, he became a supporter of the Jihad culture and travelled to Balochistan – the border region of Pakistan and Afghanistan where he had a chance encounter with the Taliban in 1995. He was very active in the Muslim community on Muslims and the justice system for years until the 9/11 attacks, which prompted him to travel to Damascus and study Arabic and Islamic Studies. This proper study of Islam made him give up his extremist interpretations.

In addition to extensive travel in the Muslim world, Mubin spent 2 years in Syria and while there travelled to Jordan and then Saudi Arabia for the Hajj. After realizing that the Islamist dream was sham, he returned to Canada and became a “walk-in” for the Canadian Security Intelligence, where he was tasked to infiltrate radical groups. He was also polygraphed to ascertain his loyalty and went on to successfully perform various undercover operations until late 2005, when he traversed to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police in what is known as the “Toronto 18” homegrown terrorism case.

After the 5 year prosecution involving 4 legal hearings at the Superior Court of Ontario, Shaikh was responsible for the conviction of ELEVEN terrorists, three of whom are now serving life. The entire case with its evidence is avaliable here: http://www3.thestar.com/static/toronto18/index.html

He has since completed a Master of Policing, Intelligence and Counter Terrorism (MPICT) through Macquarie University while testifying in one of several legal hearings, as well as competencies in Criminal Investigative Analysis and Criminal Intelligence Analysis and Management from the Toronto Police Service. Through the Canadian Psychological Association, he has completed work in assessing and treating extremists and terrorists and is considered by leading academic experts to be a primary source for the study of radicalization and homegrown terrorism. He has extensive contacts with military, intelligence and law enforcement in North America and Europe.

Mubin will begin Ph.D studies in the Psychology of Terrorism (Liverpool University) starting October 2012.

Evil is Evil. America's Breivik Moment?

The recent shooting at the Sikh Temple has brought racial hate-motivated violent extremism to the fore. Hate-motivated violent extremism directed against Muslims or look-alikes is a growing reality in white America and is the direct result of narratives that perpetuate the us vs. them mentality. Sikh women also cover their hair, and with the presence and prevalence of anti-hijab narratives, hateful, ignorant people tend not to know the difference. This is not to say "let's get the right target," because the point is that NO community should be wholesale targeted for the actions of its extremists and the same holds true for "white America."
08/07/2012 07:44 EDT
PA

Will it Take Another Attack for Canada to Take Terrorism Seriously?

The Canadian government has recently announced a plan to establish grants of $1 million to academic institutions to "study" terrorist threats to Canada. Twenty-seven years after the worst attack on Canadian interests -- the Air India bombing -- and more than a decade after 9/11, the best this government has been able to come up with is $10 million to fund academics to study what we already know?
05/30/2012 05:15 EDT
AP File

To Veil or Not to Veil -- Is That Really the Question?

Before the Supreme Court now is the question of whether a veil-wearing Muslim woman should be allowed to testify in court with the niqab remaining on. It is a full and complete travesty that this case has been made to be about the face covering and not about the sexual abuse this woman alleges she suffered.
12/12/2011 01:29 EST
Lars Hagberg, CP

The Deadly Mindset Behind "Honour Killings"

Child or adult femalicide (yes, it's a real word) of this nature is among the pre-Islamic practices that are expressly prohibited, lacking honour completely and subject to findings of guilt by God. As for judgement in a court of law, well -- the case continues...
10/24/2011 10:33 EDT
AP

Canada's Anti-Terrorism Laws: Better to Have and Not Need

In the Toronto 18 case in which I testified five times over four years, it was clear that had there been no such legislation, the offences that the Superior Court found to be criminal would probably not have been denounced as required.
09/08/2011 09:12 EDT