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Patrick LaMontagne

Cartoonist, Illustrator, Painter

Patrick LaMontagne is a nationally syndicated editorial cartoonist, freelance illustrator, and digital painter. The detail and brushwork in his award winning painting style has often been mistaken for traditional media, and serves as an antidote to the poison of following politics for a living.

Having grown up as a Canadian Armed Forces base brat, Patrick spent much of his youth in West Germany before finally ending up in Alberta in the late eighties. Settling in the Banff area in 1994, he and his wife Shonna continue their pursuit of happily ever after in Canmore, Alberta, surrounded by the beauty of the Canadian Rockies.

Despite contrary assertions made by a number of his former teachers, apparently a person can make a living drawing and colouring pictures all day.

Albertans Helping Albertans, Any Way They Can

When the flooding began in Canmore on the night of June 19th, nobody expected that the next few days would become such a nightmare for Southern Alberta. When the water finally began to recede, people transitioned from survival to recovery. Now, we're all learning to live with it. The financial devastation is going to be incredibly difficult for many to handle. Even for those who have policies with insurance companies who are covering some of their damage, the floods have obliterated any budget planning and savings for a lot of families. We've been told for years that many Canadians are carrying too much debt. Something like this increases the burden of that weight and some may break under it.
07/08/2013 07:01 EDT
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The Great Canmore Flood

People were frightened, upset, angry, frustrated and unsure of what was coming next. Some were losing their homes, others were worried theirs was next. One of the most beautiful parts of Canmore was being destroyed before our eyes and the flow of information was changing minute to minute. I saw a lot of people holding back tears.
06/21/2013 07:50 EDT
Patrick LaMontagne

Death According to an Editorial Cartoonist

Yes, it's morbid that from time to time, I make my living from a product that is derived from someone's death. When someone of note, whether political or cultural, is close to death or has died, I often feel like a vulture, sitting on a fencepost, waiting to take advantage of the situation. It's not a great feeling. And it's very difficult to be genuine and not come across as maudlin.
04/09/2013 08:04 EDT