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Sarah Robertson

Mental Health Advocate/ Founder of Canadian BFRB Support Network

Sarah Robertson's experiences and passion to address mental health stigma has led her to found the non-profit Canadian BFRB Support Network, to help others with Body-Focused Repetitive Behaviours. This is the second non-profit organization in the entire world helping people with disorders such as trichotillomania (Hair Pulling Disorder), and dermatillomania (Skin Picking Disorder).

She likes to get people talking, and that is precisely what she's doing here.

Follow her on twitter @skrobertson89

To contact Sarah directly, email: sarah@canadianbfrb.org

Visit CBSN here: http://www.canadianbfrb.org
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The Conversations We Should All Have on Bell Let's Talk Day

It's the most wonderful time of the year for Canadian mental health advocates! Wednesday, January 28 is Bell Let's Talk Day. On Bell Let's Talk Day, conversations will be taking place online, in homes, schools, and offices across the country. All wonderful, but, will you be participating in these discussions by sharing your personal experiences? Many people won't.
01/16/2015 08:56 EST
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Companies, Take a Chance on New Grads...Please?

How many times have you heard the fact that many young people can't find work in their field after graduation? Can someone please tell me why, three years later, I have yet to land my first "adult" job in my field? I can only imagine the responses I will get to that question. So before the comments come pouring in, let me just explore some situations with you.
06/24/2014 05:29 EDT
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I Have a Condition That Almost No Doctor Understands

I am just one of the millions of people in Canada who has a condition called Trichotillomania, a.k.a. Hair Pulling Disorder. These conditions are also under the umbrella term Body-Focused Repetitive Behaviours. In Canada, there are currently only two doctors who treat these conditions, and they have waiting lists for up to a year or more. This is unacceptable.
04/02/2014 08:53 EDT
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How Google Gives Us All Cancer

I think it's about time people are reminded that without a legitimate medical professional's diagnosis, you cannot just Google your symptoms and diagnose yourself as having such and such disorder or disease. As someone in the mental health field, my concern is seeing an increase of people believing they have conditions such as depression or panic attacks.
12/17/2013 05:33 EST
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Yes, I Literally Pull My Hair Out -- So do Millions of Canadians

At the age of 12, I developed a disorder called Trichotillomania, also known as "Hair Pulling Disorder". Trichotillomania is defined as an irresistible urge to pull out hair from one's scalp, eyebrows, or other areas of the body, resulting in noticeable bald spots/patches. It is classified as a Body-Focused Repetitive Behaviour, and roughly 1 to 2 million Canadians live with one. It's time to spread awareness.
10/07/2013 12:58 EDT
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Dealing With the "September Blues" for Recent Grads

Sometimes when I stop to look around and analyze my life, I notice that I'm not the only twenty-something year old who doesn't have their life figured out. Each September only serves to nail that point home, in a grim yearly spectacle I call The September Blues. The annual march of students back to school feeds the nagging suspicion that I may not be doing this whole "life" thing as well as I could be. I'm not alone.
09/08/2013 09:19 EDT
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How Mental Health Conditions Are Dismissed By Family and Friends

Someone who suffers with any form of a diagnosed mental health condition such as anxiety, bi-polar disorder or depression, are usually not able to be as open with their family, friends or workplace. There are no predictions to how someone will feel when they wake up in the morning. Many times people are patted on the back and told they are just having a bad day, or to pretty much suck it up.
08/12/2013 07:41 EDT
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Screaming 'F--- the Police' Won't Bring Sammy Justice

Yesterday, Toronto witnessed a protest in search for answers of Sammy Yatim's death. I can understand the lack of trust and respect for the police if you yourself have been a victim of police brutality. But at what point does a sincere protest become a parade of stupidity on our streets? "We want justice for Sammy" many protesters shouted. I agree whole heartedly that the questions we all have about the events of Saturday morning need to be answered. Until we get those answers, is categorizing all police officers as killers and murderers going to bring Sammy any justice?
07/30/2013 12:17 EDT
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How Celebrity Hurts the Mental Health Cause

Earlier this year Bell Let's Talk Day raised an incredible 4.8 million dollars for mental health initiatives across Canada. This is a great campaign, and I love how people in the spotlight come forward to discuss their personal mental health journeys with the public. I think it's great celebrities and stars talk about mental health issues they struggle with, but I don't think it's great how much attention is given to just the celebrity and not the mental illness itself. So why do we not treat these people, or ourselves, like heroes? We are the ones who have to deal with the mental health system, the waiting time, the unknowns, the ups and downs.
07/19/2013 12:24 EDT