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Shiloh Bouvette

Program Manager, Environmental Defence

Shiloh recalls the day when, as a suburban teenager, she discovered the works of Anre Naess and philosophy of deep ecology. Finally, she had an explanation for her teenage grumpiness -- her disconnect with nature. She promptly went for a hike.

These days, she brings her memories of teenage angst to her position of Environmental Defence’s Greenbelt Program Manager, where she plots with a coalition of 100 Ontario Groups to fend off unsustainable sprawl and keep more nature and local food closer to home. The focus of these efforts is the world-class Ontario Greenbelt -- 1.8 million acres of protected green space and prime farmland.

Shiloh holds a Bachelor of Arts in Communication from Simon Fraser University and has spent over 12 years managing projects and campaigns in the not-for-profit sector. Recently, Shiloh worked with Canopy, the Canadian charity responsible for making Harry Potter the greenest book ever published and sat on the Board of a small non-profit that teaches environmental stewardship through urban parks.

In her spare time, Shiloh can be found pickling Greenbelt veggies and organizing bike events for her progressively-minded city councillor.

That Farmland Could Be Canada's Next Condominium

Global trends show a growing number of countries, agribusinesses and large corporations scanning the globe for land purchase. They are not ignoring Canada. If we continue to lose farmland for sprawl and foreign investment, we ignore our future food sovereignty.
04/24/2012 08:01 EDT

'Tis the Season to Buy Local

The holidays are a time when we make a special effort to spread joy and generosity with family, friends and our communities. So this holiday season when you're stuck trying to find that special gift that's beyond ordinary and extra thoughtful, think local.
12/06/2011 09:26 EST

Survey Says: Ontarians Love the Greenbelt

The biggest bump in Greenbelt approval was on the topic of local food, which is becoming an increasing hot issue in Ontario. This is likely the reason we saw so much public mobilizing around the local food procurement vote in Toronto City Council, as well as the recent success of 'Foodstock.'
11/10/2011 09:10 EST

Local Food System Needs Leadership, Not Penny-Pinching

The mayor of Canada's largest city is in cost-cutting mode and a local food policy, originally passed in 2008, has just escaped the chopping block. Well almost. As many locavores will tell you, there is the price on the grocery receipt and there are the costs that we pay elsewhere -- the hospital bills, the environmental debt and the money farmers pay out of their own pockets to stay afloat.
07/27/2011 10:43 EDT