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Stephen Cera

Independent Music Professional

Stephen Cera served as the Artistic Director of the distinguished Concert Season in the George Weston Recital Hall at the Ford Centre for the Performing Arts in Toronto for nine years. Prior to that, he was a Producer with CBC Radio Music, and produced the Canadian Orchestral Sampler, which won a Financial Post Award for Business in the Arts. He also served for seven years as the Music Critic of the Baltimore Sun. His commentaries on music have been published in The Wall Street Journal, Congressional Quarterly, the Los Angeles Times and Musical America, as well as the National Post, The Globe and Mail, and Maclean’s.

He also worked as Music Supervisor for the feature film, The Gospel of John, a UK-Canada co-production directed by Philip Saville and starring Christopher Plummer, available on DVD.
Bruce Zinger

A Tale Of Two Cities That Shared Music And Coffee

"Tales of Two Cities: The Leipzig-Damascus Coffee House" revolved around the central role of the coffee house in the worlds of both 18th Century Leipzig and Damascus, uncovering cross-cultural influences between two cities which sit 3000 km. apart.
05/26/2016 04:26 EDT
Jock Carroll

Remembering The Late, Great Glenn Gould

The late Glenn Gould was a Canadian national treasure. One of the great pianists of the 20th century, his rare intellect, astonishing technique and unmatched individuality marked him as a phenomenon f...
02/24/2016 03:17 EST
Mir/National Music Centre

BLOG: Calgary's New National Music Centre Shows Public Support for Arts

The NMC should enhance the musical landscape in Calgary by becoming a focal point for activity, and create a bridge to the music industry across the country. It will be a hub for community events and activities in Calgary's East Village, a key part of that area's redevelopment. It will spur cultural tourism and likely be a catalyst for employment in commercial music and related sectors.
09/25/2015 12:16 EDT

The Musical Fist Against Anti-Semitism

As he auditioned musicians in several countries, Huberman understood the gravity of his task. He was, in effect, deciding who would live and who would likely be killed. Yet he remained determined to rescue as many colleagues as possible: not only Germans, but also Polish, Czech, and Hungarian Jews.
12/05/2013 12:33 EST