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Steve E. Anderson

Founder and Executive Director, OpenMedia.ca

Steve Anderson is the founder and Executive Director of OpenMedia.ca. Steve is an open Internet advocate, writer, and social media consultant. His writing has appeared in numerous local and national print and online publications such as The Tyee, the Toronto Star, Ottawa Citizen, Epoch Times, Common Ground, and Vue Weekly. Steve is a contributing author of CPPA book "The Internet Tree". He also write a monthly syndicated column called “Media Links”. You can find Steve's blog at http://openmedia.ca/SteveAnderson
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Canada's New Privacy Legislation Fails

This week, Industry Minister James Moore quietly tabled a new Digital Privacy Act in the Senate. The proposed legislation should safeguard Canadians' privacy online but sadly does not. The proposal is likely to reinforce the feeling that the Conservatives are just bad on privacy issues.
04/11/2014 12:37 EDT

A User Guide for the CRTC's Flawed Consultation

To help ensure that Internet users' voices are heard, your team at OpenMedia.ca have put together a question-by-question readers' guide to the CRTC's Choicebook survey. We hope you find it useful, and encourage you to take a few moments to prevent the CRTC from going in the wrong direction.
03/06/2014 12:24 EST
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So, I Can't Stream 'The Daily Show' Unless I Pay for Cable?

One night not long ago I was about to take in my daily dose of The Daily Show with Jon Stewart after work, when I was forced to deal with a new popup window on the CTV website -- CTV and other Bell Media websites are the only legal websites you can use to watch this and many other shows. But a popup appeared...
03/05/2014 05:19 EST
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Will Canada Keep Its Promise to Lower Cell Phone Prices?

It's no wonder that so many Canadians are speaking out about the state of our broken wireless market. We pay some of the highest prices in the industrialized world for often terrible cell phone service. Thankfully it looks like decision-makers are finally starting to take notice.
01/16/2014 05:24 EST
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What Minister Moore Says About Your Sky-High Cell Phone Bills

Last fall, a group of over 35 leading innovators and entrepreneurs joined OpenMedia.ca in sending a letter to Industry Minister James Moore. Our letter called for several actions to be taken to fix our broken cell phone market. Minister Moore has now replied.
01/11/2014 05:02 EST
John Lamb via Getty Images

We Did It: Understanding Canada's New Cell Phone Rules

As of yesterday, our hard-won new cell phone customer protection rules go into effect for all new cell phone contracts/sales. The new rules, which were announced by the CRTC (Canada's telecom policy-maker) in June, apply right across Canada, so cell phone users from coast to coast to coast will benefit. These new cell phone customer protection rules will not be enough to rein in Canada's Big Telecom giants, but this is a step in the right direction.
12/03/2013 12:17 EST
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Stop Big Telecom's Stranglehold on Canadian Households

The CRTC and the government should stop playing whack a mole and fully open up our networks by splitting them from Big Telecom control so Canadians can access all providers on an equal basis. We've seen again and again how Big Telecom will take any chance they can to mistreat and price-gouge Canadians, and it's time to make some common sense reforms.
10/07/2013 05:25 EDT
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What Big Telecom Is Really Afraid of: Competition

Canada's Big Three telecom giants are sounding increasingly desperate these days -- they're running expensive ads against foreign investment (read: Verizon). So what is Big Telecom really afraid of? Big Telecom's worst nightmare is seeing home-grown Canadian innovators finally have an equal platform to compete against their tired, bloated bureaucracies.
08/02/2013 12:37 EDT
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New Industry Minister: High Expectations to Lower Wireless Prices

James Moore is widely seen as a heavyweight within Cabinet and the Conservative Party, and I believe it's a positive sign for Canada's digital future that the Prime Minister has named him as our Industry Minister. His appointment will raise expectations that the government will finally take the bold action required to open our communications networks to new more affordable services for Canadians.
07/16/2013 05:41 EDT
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Internet Freedom: How Canadians Are Kept in the Dark

Here at OpenMedia.ca, we've already been hearing from Canadians outraged that our own Members of Parliament are still being denied access to the TPP text -- access that has now been granted to their counterparts in Washington D.C. We know that Canadians will not accept their Members of Parliament being kept in the dark
06/27/2013 12:34 EDT
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The People Putting Internet Freedom at Risk

As the International Telecommunication Union's negotiations move closer, more worrying developments are coming to light. At Openmedia we recently posted about some of the main concerns raised by the secretive negotiations, which threaten to change the Internet as we know it. A recent report highlights concerns that the proposals are particularly harmful to the developing world because accessing Internet content will become more expensive. Some content providers might choose to simply stop servicing regions with customers that have limited buying power. It's the role users play in Internet governance, not governments and big telecom conglomerates, that should be expanded.
10/10/2012 05:18 EDT
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Don't Let the UN Change the Internet You Know

We are deeply troubled by the United Nations' International Telecommunications Union (ITU) proposals that seek to apply outdated telecommunication policy to the Internet. Any ITU process pertaining to Internet governance should be decentralized, transparent, accountable, and open to participation by Internet users and all stakeholders, with equal footing.
09/18/2012 07:59 EDT
AP

Dragged Before a Judge Just for Clicking on the Wrong Link?

Imagine a world where you could receive a fine, and possibly be dragged before a judge, just for clicking on the wrong link, or where big media companies could demand your private online information. Here in Canada, our government looked at giving this kind of control to big media, yet the public opposition led them to decide against it.
07/12/2012 06:24 EDT