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Susan Eng

Advocate, Commentator

Susan Eng is a Toronto lawyer and former Executive Vice President of the Canadian Association of Retired Persons. During her 8-year tenure as head of advocacy, Susan led CARP to shape the public discourse and secure legislative change on key issues such as pension reform, investor protection, mandatory retirement, workplace age discrimination, home care and seniors’ poverty. Increasingly, CARP had become a trusted source of public policy input at all levels of government and in the media. In 2012, Susan was named one of the The Hill Times’ Top 100 Lobbyists.

Susan was the Chair of the Metropolitan Toronto Police Services Board from 1991-1995 where she advanced issues of public accountability, police use of force, anti-racism and fiscal responsibility and initiated groundbreaking policy and organizational changes while under intense media scrutiny.

Community service has been a long term commitment. Susan successfully campaigned, along with other redress groups across the country, for a Parliamentary apology and redress for 62 years of legislated racism under the Head Tax and Exclusion Acts. 2016 is the 10th Anniversary of the Parliamentary apology.

Susan served on the Board of Directors of the Urban Alliance on Race Relations. She was on the executive of the Chinese Canadian National Council. She was a founder of the Yee Hong Centre for Geriatric Care, a world renowned care centre providing culturally appropriate care for Chinese, South Asian, Japanese and Filipino seniors.

Susan has served on the boards of the Canadian Civil Liberties Association and the YWCA of Greater Toronto. She was named a YWCA’s Woman of Distinction. She served three successive terms on the Governing Council of the University of Toronto and received the Arbour Award for her voluntary service to the University.

Susan was awarded the Law Society Medal in 2015 for outstanding service in the profession.
CP

Take Advantage of the Long Campaign by Getting Informed

A longer campaign is a boon to self-professed policy nerds because there's more time to get into complex issues like healthcare or labour markets. But for average voters to figure out which party would suit their needs best, they have to dig through the headlines.
10/09/2015 05:27 EDT
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Top 10 Reasons Not To Start a War With Seniors

Much is made of health care costs for the frail elderly. But the healthcare spending curve by age group is actually U-shaped with equally significant amounts spent for childbirth and early childhood problems. So is one okay and the other to be disparaged? Does it need to be said that we were all once born and will all eventually get really old if we're lucky?
09/25/2014 12:31 EDT
Getty

Canadian Healthcare Needs to Tackle Dementia

News that Spirit of the West vocalist, John Mann, has early onset Alzheimer's is the latest in a series of wake up calls that Canada needs to get ready for a burgeoning incidence of dementia as the population ages. The percentage of people afflicted may not be increasing but the sheer size of the boomer generation reaching the vulnerable age bands is a challenge that Canada's healthcare system has yet to meet. It is already on the minds of many: three-quarters of CARP members polled were touched by dementia, and most (81 per cent) think Canada is not prepared for it as boomers age.
09/08/2014 05:13 EDT
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Top 10 Dumb Things People Say About Pensions

Canadians are certainly living longer, healthier lives but not everyone. Twenty four percent of seniors have multiple chronic conditions and take on average 5 different prescription meds. Older workers who lost their jobs in the late 1990s had three times as much difficulty getting new ones as their younger counterparts and they either got jobs within the first two years or not at all.
02/22/2014 01:26 EST
CP

CPP Increase Opponents Sound Hysterical

The employer groups that vehemently oppose CPP hikes mostly don't offer any pension support for their employees. And their arguments are increasingly hysterical. They are still calling any CPP increase a "job killer" and managed to convince the junior minister of Finance to parrot their talking points.
12/13/2013 05:36 EST
Getty

Senior Discounts Mean More Than $2 Shampoo

Some banks have decided to eliminate their cost-free seniors' accounts. Of the different marketing messages they could have used, TD went with casting boomer-seniors as a well-off group no longer needing the low-cost services. But that misses the point. People who don't need the low-cost account for themselves still want to make sure that they are available to those who need them.
11/29/2013 07:55 EST
CP

Why CPP Matters: Deconstructing Pension Reform

Canadians are not using RRSPs enough, and those that do are in the higher income brackets. The people who need help saving for retirement are those earning under $100,000 -- i.e. most Canadians. So the goal is to ensure that any change has broad effect and target the reasons why people are not saving.
11/22/2013 05:12 EST

Omnibus Budget Bill Would Go Down Smoother in Pieces

On Monday, May 14, parliament will vote on whether to give it second reading and send it to committee. Despite vociferous opposition calls for splitting the current 400-page bill to deal separately with issues, Conservative House Leader Peter Van Loan flatly refused, saying that the government wants its economic program passed quickly.
05/11/2012 07:24 EDT
CP

An Alternative Vision for Taking Care of Gram and Grandpa

The real importance of the Health Accords, which the Government has dodged responsibility for, was not to keep the provinces happy but to keep Canadians healthy. National cooperation, with or without the feds as the uber-paymaster and shot-caller, is needed to produce the political spine to get this done.
02/09/2012 07:47 EST
PA

Hands Off OAS: Pension Changes Make Canadians Work Poorer, Not Longer

Raising the OAS age will target those least capable of doing without it. Rest assured, no one is going to quit working just because they will now get about $600 a month. But this will be very meaningful for those now living on less since access to Guaranteed Income Supplement is tied to receiving Old Age Security.
02/03/2012 06:16 EST