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Trudy Lieberman

Journalist, Adjunct Associate Professor of Public Health, Hunter College, NYC and media advisor, EvidenceNetwork.ca

Trudy Lieberman, a journalist for more than 40 years, is an adjunct associate professor of public health at Hunter College in New York City. She is a longtime contributor to the Columbia Journalism Review and blogs for its website, CJR.org, about media coverage of health care, Social Security and retirement. As a William Ziff Fellow at the Center for Advancing Health, she contributes regularly to the Prepared Patient Blog.
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Meet the Canadian Doctor Who Prescribes Income to Treat Poverty

Last fall when I visited Canada, I met a Toronto doctor named Gary Bloch who has developed a poverty tool for medical practitioners. Bloch's idea was to zoom in on the social determinants of health -- food, housing, transportation -- all poverty markers linked to bad health and poor health outcomes.
11/27/2014 08:14 EST
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Canada and America Are Both Guilty of Rationing Healthcare

Yes, we do ration healthcare in America. It's just that those affected the most are those who have the least income. In America, we have become oddly blasé about income inequality and its consequences, increasingly willing to let those without simply do without. But the mere hint that a needs -- or evidence-based -- process might be used to allocate scarce or high-priced healthcare raises an outcry from those accustomed to getting what they want, when they want it.
11/06/2014 08:23 EST
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This Doctor Treats Poverty Like a Disease

What would you think if your doctor handed you a prescription that recommended filing your tax returns or applying for food or income benefit programs instead of the usual medicines for high blood pressure or diabetes? You'd probably say the physician was nuts. Tax refunds? Food? What do they have to do with making you healthier?
04/13/2014 10:43 EDT
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Canadian Health Care: Separating Opinion From Fact

One thing Americans and Canadians can agree on is that we don't want each other's health care systems. In truth, most Americans don't know how Canada's system works and Canadians don't know much about the U.S. system. Yes, there are waiting lists for some services -- but, no, Canadians are not coming across the border in droves to get American care. Separating fact from opinion as the Canadian ambassador long ago urged was something I tried to do as I made my way across Canada while visiting there recently. In some ways, the Canadian system is very different from U.S. health care. In other ways, it's very much the same and faces similar challenges in the years ahead.
01/29/2014 09:20 EST
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Why Canadian Health Care Costs So Much

We know that the U.S. has the most expensive health care in the world. But beyond noting that dubious achievement, we seldom ask why. On my recent visit to Canada as a Fulbright scholar, I stopped by to pose that question to one of their leading health care experts, David Dodge, an economist who has served as federal deputy health minister and seven terms as governor of the Bank of Canada.
01/14/2014 05:18 EST
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Reducing Obesity: It Takes a Village

During my recent visit to Canada, I had a chance to meet Dr. Yoni Freedhoff, an obesity expert. What he had to say about reducing obesity was somewhat surprising and could be useful for people who are struggling to lose weight or helping others who are.
11/28/2013 05:35 EST