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Will Sacks

CEO, Kindara

Entrepreneur, blogger, inventor, musician currently living in Boulder Colorado. I am currently working on building Kindara. We're accomplishing a positive social mission while creating beautiful and useful products that help women meet their health goals. I've known from a young age that I'd be an entrepreneur, and even though it's maddeningly hard sometimes, I love the process and thrive on the challenge. I'm becoming certain I'll be doing startups for the next several decades.

Before Kindara, I co-founded Lumetro (an online lighting distributor) and acted as director of sustainability at Watershed Technologies. I am a graduate of HAXLR8R, Founder Institute, the Landmark Education Curriculum for Living, and McGill University, where I studied Mechanical Engineering and Economics. I have a passion for new technology, social and cultural evolution and activism, and entrepreneurship.

From 2001 - 2003 I designed, built, and tested the iSun solar car. In 2003 I raced the car from Chicago to Los Angeles in the 2003 American Solar Challenge.

I love music (EDM especially), Burning Man, quantified self, TED, self-development, sexuality, dancing, and things that put a dent in the universe and move the human race forward. I blog at willsacks.com
nito100 via Getty Images

It's Time To Change Our Attitudes About HIV/AIDS

HIV infection is decidedly no longer a death sentence, and no longer a major inhibitor of quality of life. HIV-positive people can live long and healthy lives. For those with access to care, some sex educators now talk about HIV infection as more of a nuisance to be managed than than a life-altering diagnosis.
11/26/2015 02:36 EST
David Falk

Talking About Sex Is Easier in Canada Than It Is in the U.S.

Sadly, by addressing their reproductive health decisions openly, American women still run social, civil, and human rights risks that Canadian women no longer need to worry about. Additionally, in the U.S., if a woman speaks out about her body, she risks being pinned with moral connotations. Why? Because the subject of a woman's body is still claimed by both church and state.
07/17/2015 08:13 EDT