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How to Run Hills Like a Pro

09/15/2013 11:45 EDT | Updated 11/15/2013 05:12 EST

I used to avoid hills like the plague. My legs turned to rubber while gasping like fish out of water to the summit of what could only be described as Mount Everest II. It was far from an enjoyable experience, but as I got used to running hills I began to appreciate what they were doing for my body. I developed stronger legs and became a stronger runner. Now, I run for the hills and enjoy it. Everest II, it turned out, was just about 600 metres long and not really that steep.

In a recent email interview with Dr. Jack Scaff, the Honolulu resident known as, "The Father of Running" in Hawaii, he shared his expertise on hill training. In his book, Your First Marathon, the Last Chapter in Long Distance Running, hill training is covered extensively.

"Hill running is good strength training, however, it tends to be anaerobic," Dr. Scaff said. "When one approaches a hill, run perpendicular to the horizon, shorten their stride and come off the backside of the hill or downhill using the same type of stride -- short steps going up the hill, the same short steps coming down, longer strides on the flat and no pounding at any time. While going up hill also remain upright and lean as little as possible into a hill. Swing your arms parallel to your body and not cross."

He further comments, "Running downhill is a paradox since all the muscle can do is contract. As you run downhill, the muscle must relax at the same time while it is trying to contract. And of course this decreases recruitment as well as subjects the muscle to a greater potential for injury. There is another style of downhill running known as out-of-control or windmill running (which is what the arms look like) in which the individual runs downhill with terribly long strides, simply following through with longer and longer strides while going faster and faster. It's effective but difficult to stop, dangerous and road rash is a certainty."

More Tips:

1. How to run a hill: head up, pump your arms, lean slightly forward and run about 80 per cent effort and jog or walk on the way down. Repeat six to 10 times.

2. Pick a hill suitable for your training. For average runners choose a hill that is about 90 seconds long.

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