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DeSmog Canada

We believe Canadians deserve more constructive conversations on the issues that matter most to them. Just as we can pollute the physical environment, we also run the risk of polluting public conversations.

That’s why we started DeSmog Canada, the country’s only news source dedicated to exploring solutions for cleaning up Canada’s polluted public square.

At DeSmog Canada, we go beyond the headlines to cut through the spin clouding the debate on important national issues such as natural resource development, the economy, democracy, scientific research, government transparency and industry accountability.

Through our news, opinion and analysis, we seek to raise the level of public discourse. Our contributors include some of the country’s top writers and thought leaders on energy issues and public dialogue.

Our work is regularly featured in the Huffington Post, The Tyee, the Vancouver Observer and the Victoria Times Colonist and our research and reporting has sparked coverage by the Globe and Mail, Toronto Star, Calgary Herald, Vancouver Sun, CBC and Metro News.

Read more about DeSmog Canada.
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4 Things Will And Kate Need To Know About B.C.

Don't get me wrong: B.C. truly is a glorious place -- the type of place you can fly over in a seaplane and easily think the wilderness will never end. But it's also one of the world's last frontiers and the race is on to cut down our old-growth forests, to send more oil tankers into our ports, to build natural gas plants in our salmon estuaries and to flood our rivers for megadams.
09/29/2016 01:59 EDT
Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

How Did Climate Advocates Get The Fort Mac Conversation So Wrong?

Connecting extreme weather events with climate change isn't exactly a new thing; from Hurricane Sandy to the California droughts, it's a conversation that goes hand in hand with every natural disaster, and it's usually handled in a reasonable fashion. So how did the climate conversation around the still-raging Fort McMurray wildfire that destroyed thousands of homes become so befuddling-ly messed up?
05/12/2016 11:51 EDT
THE CANADIAN PRESS/Dean Bennett

Pipelines Or Indigenous Rights? Premier Notley Can't Have Both

The Alberta government clearly has a reason for wanting to facilitate the export of more oil and gas via the proposed TransCanada Energy East and Kinder Morgan Trans-Mountain pipelines. But the NDP committed in its election platform to implementing the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and to "work with Alberta Indigenous Peoples to build a relationship of trust and ensure respectful consultation."
04/14/2016 10:58 EDT
IvelinRadkov via Getty Images

Inaction Scores Harper a Failing Grade on Climate Change

For more than two decades, Mark Jaccard has been penning "report cards" about Canada's environmental track record. The results haven't been pretty. His annual evaluations were harnessed in the mid-2000s by Stephen Harper as arguments for why the Conservatives deserved a shot at governing the country. Jaccard's latest report card, released on October 6, concludes the Conservative Party has since "implemented virtually no policies that would materially reduce emissions" despite making significant emissions pledges for 2020 and 2050. Jaccard concludes the absence of such actions shows "they must have had no intention" of dealing with climate change.
10/15/2015 05:05 EDT
Getty

B.C.-Alaska Mining File Is A Tale of Two Countries

Alaskans emphasize they are not against resource extraction, provided there are adequate environmental and financial safeguards, but believe Canada's record -- most recently illustrated by the Mount Polley mine tailings dam collapse -- shows that B.C.'s regulations are not strong enough to protect downstream communities.
10/06/2015 07:59 EDT
Wilson Hui/Flickr

Alaskans Leery Of Bad Neighbours Amid B.C. Gold Rush

Long-held perceptions of Canada as a country with strict environmental standards and B.C. as a province that values natural beauty are taking a near-fatal beating in Southeast Alaska, where many now regard Canadians as bad neighbours who are unilaterally making decisions that could threaten the region's two major economic drivers.
07/15/2015 01:22 EDT