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Andra Vomir, Kinesiologist, Urges You To Give Yourself The Space To Listen To Your Body

02/03/2016 04:07 EST | Updated 02/03/2017 05:12 EST
Kavi Guppta

Photo credit: Kavi Guppta

At a time when we increasingly rely on Google and Instagram for answers to our problems, the role of kinesiology, the study of body movement, is becoming more important to help us make our own decisions.

Two years ago Andra Vomir, 26, sat down in front of a kinesiologist with one ask, "I'd like to figure out what I am supposed to be doing with my life." Through a muscle test, she unexpectedly found that negative experiences from almost 10 years ago were blocking her from moving forward.

We recently talked about her experience with kinesiology and its influence to start her own practice. Vomir is the founder of Andra Maria Wellness in Melbourne, Australia.

Tell me about kinesiology.

Kinesiology helps to uncover the emotional causes of self-limiting beliefs, distress, anxiety, pain, illness, and disease. Kinesiology uses light muscle testing to identify stressors in the body, allowing us to work on a deeper level than with conventional therapy.

Using an energetic framework, we apply various techniques based on the traditional Chinese medicine meridian system to raise the vibrational frequency of the body, allowing a person to experience benefits immediately in most cases.

How did you discover kinesiology?

I discovered kinesiology over two years ago, when I was going through a time of very intense self-work. I had recently moved to Australia from Canada and couldn't understand why some people seemed to have their lives all figured out, but I was so emotional, and stuck and confused all the time.

I managed a wellness centre at the time, and there was a kinesiologist working there. "I'd like to figure out what I am supposed to be doing with my life." I told her. "That's too big of a goal to work on in one-hour, right?"

Using only light muscle testing on my arm, she asked me to elaborate about several emotions and beliefs that my body was identifying as stressful. I found out that I had a keen desire to work with people on a deeper level, something that I knew deep down, but I never wanted to admit to myself because of my self-worth issues at the time. The kinesiologist identified a stressful event that happened when I was 17, which was essentially repeating itself again. She even identified that I had several friends in Canada that I was embarrassed and reluctant to be my authentic self around.

What influenced you to start your own practice?

I started my career in communications and then most recently managed one of Melbourne's largest wellness centres. During that time, I was a sponge and learned everything I possibly could; in the back of my mind I was always calculating how I could one day apply what I've learned to my own business.

Once I started studying kinesiology, I knew that this wasn't something I was going to be doing as a side-job or just for fun. I take it very seriously and I want to be someone that students read about years from now and say "Andra helped make kinesiology more accessible and accepted."

What does a productive day look like?

In reality: A day where I've both learned something and taught something.

On paper: waking up early and doing my 30-45 minute morning routine that consists of gratitude journaling and meditation; seeing four clients at the clinic and then jumping online for a couple of hours; and then yoga in the evening followed by dinner with my husband.

Why should we make time to do nothing every day?

It's not necessarily about doing nothing. It's more about giving yourself the space to connect within. This typically happens when we do something we love. For some people it may mean a practice consisting of meditation, or yoga. For others it may mean strumming the guitar or drawing. It doesn't matter what it is, the point is to give yourself the space to listen to your body and your heart. Listen and be ready for it to change you, your perspective and your life.

Follow Andra on Instagram and Facebook.

I'm fascinated by creative women -- their passions, challenges, and contributions to society. If you know a creative woman to feature, please tweet @kmarano.

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