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Lee Boyce

Strength Coach, Internationally Published Fitness Writer

Lee Boyce is an internationally known fitness writer and strength coach, and owner of Boyce Training Systems, based in Toronto, Ont. His work is published regularly in many major fitness magazines including Men's Health, Men's Fitness, Esquire, TNATION, Muscle & Fitness, Bodybuilding.com, and Inside Fitness. In 2013, he was named to the Team Jamaica training and treatment staff for the Penn Relays international track meet. Currently Boyce works with clients and athletes for strength, conditioning, and sport performance. Visit his website www.leeboycetraining.com for more articles and TV media.
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Bad Fitness Advice Isn't The Problem, You Are

People actively search for a second opinion or at least do their homework on the guy they're about to hire to do their accounting, their surgery or their drywall. Strangely, in the fitness world, all it takes is a six pack and a grin to make consumers reach for their pocketbooks to buy the new AbCrusher off a TV infomercial.
05/24/2016 04:46 EDT

6 Ways Your Workouts Are Aging You Faster

You can definitely combat the aging process by way of exercise. Proper exercise. If you're not paying attention to your body's balance, biology, and safety, you may be moving towards an injured, decrepit, and immobile body faster than you can say "nip tuck."
07/08/2015 05:24 EDT
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9 Reasons Your Gym Routine Isn't Helping You Lose Fat

When it comes to fat loss, many will agree it's one of the hardest things to train for -- especially when the goal is to shed more than a pound or two. It's no secret that dropping significant amounts of body fat requires discipline and tactical training methods that are well planned out. Here's a checklist of things to avoid, that could stand in the way of a lean body.
03/17/2015 01:27 EDT
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Why the Fitness World Needs Tracy Anderson

The truth is, if it wasn't for people like Tracy, there would be no one left in the fitness industry to break boundaries of fitness training. The studies I've done in class, the practical learning I've done with hundreds of clients, and the training I've done as a competitive athlete has proven futile now that we've been exposed to the painful reality of what fitness training should be all about.
05/20/2014 08:57 EDT

Do Personal Trainers Need College Degrees?

Lack of degrees or certain certifications sometimes can bar very competent individuals from receiving promotions or raises, regardless of how many years of experience and industry-specific accomplishments they may have achieved. It's not about the certs or degrees, but about the experience and practical application of foundations of personal training as they're found specific to each client on a case by case basis.
02/05/2014 12:54 EST
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Exercise "Propaganda" Has You Training Too Hard

A simple Google image search of fitness photos, will net you a plethora of motivational sayings and quotes that encourage trainees to push through pain, fight for the extra rep, and basically beat yourself to a pulp in the gym, while reminding yourself that "pain is weakness leaving the body". But what is the end result of our fitocracy fascination? Lots of injuries, for starters.
12/02/2013 12:35 EST
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Why Personal Trainers Have a Bad Rap

If you log on to forum pages of any major gym chain, it's a safe bet that you'll notice a collection of posts from unhappy clients that talk about their bad experiences in the gym. Now, it's understandable that with large fitness chains, it's expected that 100 per cent of the clients will not be satisfied. But the umbrella of the commercial gym often gives personal trainers a bad rap too.
11/04/2013 12:19 EST
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Think Athletes Are the Pinnacle of Good Health? Think Again!

The demands of most sports involve stops and starts, plenty of impact, aggressive explosiveness, possibly one-sided dominance (think of a ball sport) and a measure of strength. As a result, the joints have to take a beating on a regular basis in some way or another for as long as the sport is being participated in.
10/11/2013 05:22 EDT
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The Surprising Health Benefits of Lifting Heavy Weights

Making muscles grow does involve weight training -- to that I'll agree. But stay with me. It also involves lifting weights at a particular intensity (that means how heavy the weights are), combined with a particular volume (that means just how many sets of a given exercise you do in each workout). Remove one of those two factors, and your muscles won't grow.
10/07/2013 05:23 EDT