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Mai Zamora

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I Was Fast Asleep When a 7.2-Magnitude Earthquake Hit Us

Posted: 10/28/2013 5:21 pm

World Vision staff member Mai Zamora was sleeping peacefully in her home in central Philippines last week, when a 7.2-magnitude earthquake hit the area. What she experienced in the hours that followed left her trembling for days.

It was Tuesday morning in Cebu City. I was in the middle of my sleep when a little voice inside my head called "Mai, wake up." I thought it was just a dream. Suddenly, I heard something like roaring thunder. Everybody in the neighbourhood was shouting. People were panicking.
I was in our rented apartment, an old wooden house built more than a decade ago. I felt the strong shaking inside the house and it took me awhile to realize that it was indeed an earthquake.

Heading downstairs, I felt the room shake violently. The walls were swinging. Everything around me was plunging down, including the TV set, books and cabinets. My housemates all looked so scared and shivering. We were still wearing our sleeping clothes.

The strong quake lasted over a minute. It sounded like bulldozers demolishing houses. The dreaded aftershocks soon followed, at minute intervals. It was so terrifying. I thought it was the end of the world. I could only think of my family then, who lived far from me.

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Children and families line the streets outside their collapsed houses, uncertain of what to do next.


After a short while, fire trucks and ambulances passed by the streets. Debris was falling from the tall buildings. Many structures showed cracks while aftershocks persisted. I began to feel dizzy. Many people outside were looking up at the high-rise buildings, perhaps waiting for them to collapse. Some were crying, others were holding on to each other. Some were just walking in circles wondering. It seemed that everyone was wondering "Could this be real?"

philippines children
In any emergency, World Vision's first priority is meeting children's needs. In the chaos, girls and boys are vulnerable to poverty, injury and abuse.


But it was. And that reality sank in as my workmates and I sought for a safer place in the city. We stayed at the house of a colleague overnight. However, I didn't have a good sleep. I wished I'd had a button to switch off the recurring aftershocks.

Eventually, I learned from the news that the epicenter of the quake was in the neighboring island of Bohol. The damages there were even more extensive and horrible than in our city. Images of massive devastation were circulated over Facebook. I've have travelled to Bohol many times to visit children who are part of World Vision's development programs there. What I saw through social media broke my heart.

In almost five years of covering disasters, this one hit me the hardest. At the onset, I did my chores of sending updates overTwitter and responding to media inquiries. But honestly, I was trembling. The thought of those aftershocks scares me, even now.

The night of the quake, the villagers felt safer staying outside on the streets.They were setting up temporary tents on a cold, dark night. Some families and children slept on the rice fields while others found shelter at evacuation centers. One mother shared, "I thanked God for my second life. My children need me!"

The day after the quake, World Vision response teams were deployed to do a rapid assessment of the situation. Who was in need? What kind of help did they require? And, for World Vision, what was happening to the children?

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Part of keeping children safe in a crisis is giving them safe places to play. Here, Mai enjoys a moment of fun with the children.


Trying to recover from our own personal experiences in Cebu, we were also relentless about looking into the needs and situation in Bohol. We recognized the risks but knew we should keep going. We couldn't let the families suffer more.Work like this is always a leap of faith.
Roaming around Bohol, we saw massive destruction in of all kinds: collapsed buildings, old churches, destroyed houses big and small. There were the anxious family members hoping for signs of life - and the continuous, heartbreaking retrieval of bodies. It's hard to describe what that was like.

Listening to the tales of the survivors was gruelling. A child survivor recalled how who he was tending the cow when the quake happened. "I was crawling on the ground and the cow was running all around. I kept crawling until the earthquake stopped. I hugged my mother tightly when I arrived home," the 12-year-old child shared.

I felt so sorry for those who lost their loved ones. My heart went to the children facing the challenges living at the evacuation centres. Some families had set up camp just in front of their collapsed houses. Others were in makeshift tents in the rice fields. Hundreds of families had nothing to eat while the aftershocks kept coming back!

Despite these challenges, the survivors were determined to keep hoping. They were patient as they lined up for a few sips of clean drinking water from the scarce but safe supply. I was amazed at how they always remembered to help each other.

We were told that the aftershocks could last another week or more. And after seeing the devastation, I know that schools, houses and communities will take a long time to rebuild. I will continue to send my updates, over Twitter and Facebook, to hundreds of World Vision offices around the world, so they have information to give their media. Perhaps people will read of the children here and find it in their hearts to give.

Read more about World Vision's work in the Philippines
http://www.worldvision.ca/give-a-gift/Pages/EmergencyReliefWhereIt'sNeededMost.aspx
http://worldvision.org.ph/stories/aidworkers-diary-central-visayas-earthquake#

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  • Homeowner Eddy Marshall becomes emotional as he surveys the damage to his basement at his residence in High River, Alberta on Monday, July 1, 2013. A second wave of homeowners and business owners were allowed to return to the flood ravaged town since the disaster struck on June 20. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jordan Verlage

  • Mike Sojer moves clothing and items from his family's clothing store as clean up work commences on downtown places of business in High River, Alberta on July 1, 2013. A second wave of homeowners and business owners were allowed to return to the flood ravaged town since the disaster struck on June 20. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jordan Verlage

  • A resident walks past a motor boat lying in the street in High River, Alberta on Monday, July 1, 2013. A second wave of homeowners and business owners were allowed to return to the flood ravaged town since the disaster struck on June 20. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jordan Verlage

  • Homeowner Eddy Marshall carries belonging from his basement at his residence in High River, Alberta on Monday, July 1, 2013. A second wave of homeowners and business owners were allowed to return to the flood ravaged town since the disaster struck on June 20.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jordan Verlage

  • Mud and building contents litter the sidewalk as clean up work commences on downtown places of business in High River, Alberta on Monday, July 1, 2013. A second wave of homeowners and business owners were allowed to return to the flood ravaged town since the disaster struck on June 20. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jordan Verlage

  • A pile of debris sits outside a Town of High River Municipal building as clean up work commences on downtown places of business in High River, Alberta on Monday, July 1, 2013. A second wave of homeowners and business owners were allowed to return to the flood ravaged town since the disaster struck on June 20. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jordan Verlage

  • A volunteer's boots are caked with mud as clean up work continues on downtown places of business in High River, Alberta on Monday, July 1, 2013. A second wave of homeowners and business owners were allowed to return to the flood ravaged town since the disaster struck on June 20. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jordan Verlage

  • Water surrounds homes in a flooded neighborhood in High River, Alberta, Canada on Saturday, June 29, 2013. The Alberta government is letting people who live in High River return to their homes in stages after being forced out by floods over a week earlier. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Jeff McIntosh)

  • Water floods a neighborhood in High River, Alberta, Canada on Saturday, June 29, 2013. The Alberta government is letting people who live in High River return to their homes in stages after being forced out by floods over a week earlier. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Jeff McIntosh)

  • A residents cleans up his home in High River, Alberta, Canada on Saturday, June 29, 2013. The Alberta government is letting people who live in High River return to their homes in stages after being forced out by floods over a week earlier. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Jeff McIntosh)

  • Water floods a neighborhood in High River, Alberta, Canada on Saturday, June 29, 2013. The Alberta government is letting people who live in High River return to their homes in stages after being forced out by floods over a week earlier. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Jeff McIntosh)

  • Waters flood a neighborhood in High River, Alberta, Canada on Saturday, June 29, 2013. The Alberta government is letting people who live in High River return to their homes in stages after being forced out by floods more than a week ago. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Jeff McIntosh)

  • Heaps of damaged goods pile up on High River streets, as residents are finally allowed to return.

  • Resident Christine Doefel wipes away tears as she leaves a reception centre after getting entry permits and clean-up kits from the Red Cross in High River, Alta., Saturday, June 29, 2013. The Alberta government is letting people who live in High River return to their homes in stages after being forced out by floods more than a week ago.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

  • A Red Cross volunteer helps residents as they leaves a reception centre after getting an entry permit and a clean-up kit from the Red Cross in High River, Alta., Saturday, June 29, 2013. The Alberta government is letting people who live in High River return to their homes in stages after being forced out by floods more than a week ago.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

  • Residents Christine Doefel, left, and her daughter Brooklynn Carney, embrace as the leave a reception centre after getting entry permits and clean-up kits from the Red Cross in High River, Alta., Saturday, June 29, 2013. The Alberta government is letting people who live in High River return to their homes in stages after being forced out by floods more than a week ago.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

  • Residents leave a reception centre after getting entry permits and clean-up kits from the Red Cross in High River, Alta., Saturday, June 29, 2013. The Alberta government is letting people who live in High River return to their homes in stages after being forced out by floods more than a week ago.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

  • Residents embrace as they leave a reception centre after getting an entry permit and a clean-up kit from the Red Cross in High River, Alta., Saturday, June 29, 2013. The Alberta government is letting people who live in High River return to their homes in stages after being forced out by floods more than a week ago.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

  • A residents leaves a reception centre after getting an entry permit and a clean-up kit from the Red Cross in High River, Alta., Saturday, June 29, 2013. The Alberta government is letting people who live in High River return to their homes in stages after being forced out by floods more than a week ago.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

  • Residents leave a reception centre after get entry permits and clean-up kits from the Red Cross in High River, Alta., Saturday, June 29, 2013. The Alberta government is letting people who live in High River return to their homes in stages after being forced out by floods more than a week ago.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

  • Residents wait in line to get entry permits to the flooded town of High River, Alta., Saturday, June 29, 2013. The Alberta government is letting people who live in High River to return to their homes in stages after being forced out by floods more than a week ago. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

  • Al Moore, a 42-year-resident of High River, listens to the radio broadcast on Friday, June 28, 2013 of the new re-entry plan for evacuees northwest of High River, Alberta. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jordan Verlage

  • The Calgary flood as seen from space.

  • The Calgary flood as seen from space compared with a before-and-after photo.

  • Calgary mayor Naheed Nenshi, middle, and Calgary Stampeders president Gord Norrie, 2nd right, and others during pregame cerimonies honoring Alberta Flood Relief first responders and find raising efforts prior to CFL action between Calgary and BC in Calgary, Alberta on Friday, June 28, 2013. (CFL PHOTO - Larry MacDougal)

  • Calgary Stampeders Jon Cornish leaps with the ball during second half CFL action against the BC Lions in Calgary, Alberta on Friday, June 28, 2013. Cornish pledged $2,000 to Alberta flood relief immediately following the game. (CFL PHOTO - Larry MacDougal)

  • Cleanup continues on the Calgary Stampede grounds one week after major flooding in Calgary, Alberta on Thursday, June 27, 2013. The Elbow River flows by on to top and left, Saddledome is situated lower right and the chuckwagon track and rodeo grounds are top.

  • This photo provided by Transportation Safety Board shows a train with derailed tankers at the Bonny Brook bridge in Calgary, Alberta Canada on Thursday, June 27, 2013. The City of Calgary says conditions have stabilized at the site of the bridge collapse that caused six cars to derail and start sinking into the Bow River. Canadian Pacific Railway says five of the cars are carrying a petroleum product used to dilute raw oilsands bitumen. The city's acting fire chief has said crews are stringing a cable through the railcars and securing it to bulldozers on land. The industrial area near the bridge has been evacuated and booms are being deployed down river in case of any spills. There are no homes nearby, but several business are effected. (AP Photo/Transportation Safety Board via The Canadian Press)

  • Monica West carries damaged goods out of a souvenir shop as clean-up crews work at the Calgary Zoo in Calgary, Alberta, Canada on Tuesday, June 25, 2013. Heavy rains caused flooding, closed roads, and forced evacuations across Southern Alberta. Calgary Zoo staff risked their lives over the weekend to stop a hippo from escaping into the swollen Bow River. Director of animal care, conservation and research, Jake Veasey, says flood waters in the hippos' enclosure rose high enough during the floods for the dangerous herbivores to swim out. One hippo named Lobi was feeling particularly adventurous and was moving freely around the African Savannah building. Veasey had to break a window to get into the building and he swam in the muddy flood waters to find the animal. Zoo staff used cinder blocks and construction equipment to block Lobi inside the building. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Jeff McIntosh)

  • A muddied research book dries as clean-up crews work at the Calgary Zoo in Calgary, Alberta, Canada on Tuesday, June 25, 2013. Heavy rains caused flooding, closed roads, and forced evacuations across Southern Alberta. Calgary Zoo staff risked their lives over the weekend to stop a hippo from escaping into the swollen Bow River. Director of animal care, conservation and research, Jake Veasey, says flood waters in the hippos' enclosure rose high enough during the floods for the dangerous herbivores to swim out. One hippo named Lobi was feeling particularly adventurous and was moving freely around the African Savannah building. Veasey had to break a window to get into the building and he swam in the muddy flood waters to find the animal. Zoo staff used cinder blocks and construction equipment to block Lobi inside the building. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Jeff McIntosh)

  • A soldier walks by a pile of speedboats in High River, Alberta on Tuesday, June 25, 2013. High River was hit by a devastating flood on June 20 which caused a mass evacuation of the entire town although some residents chose to defy the order. Alberta's premier pledged $1 billion on Monday to help people recover from the floods. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Jordan Verlage)

  • A road crew foreman surveys the washed-out lanes of northbound MacLeod Trail in Calgary, Alta., Monday, June 24, 2013. Heavy rains caused flooding, closed roads, and forced evacuations across Southern Alberta. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Jeff McIntosh)

  • Clean-up crews work at the Calgary Zoo in Calgary, Alberta, Canada on Tuesday, June 25, 2013. Heavy rains caused flooding, closed roads, and forced evacuations across Southern Alberta. Calgary Zoo staff risked their lives over the weekend to stop a hippo from escaping into the swollen Bow River. Director of animal care, conservation and research, Jake Veasey, says flood waters in the hippos' enclosure rose high enough during the floods for the dangerous herbivores to swim out. One hippo named Lobi was feeling particularly adventurous and was moving freely around the African Savannah building. Veasey had to break a window to get into the building and he swam in the muddy flood waters to find the animal. Zoo staff used cinder blocks and construction equipment to block Lobi inside the building. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Jeff McIntosh)

  • Wreckage lies along Center Street in High River, Alberta on Tuesday, June 25, 2013. High River was hit by a devastating flood on June 20 which caused a mass evacuation of the entire town although some residents chose to defy the order. Alberta's premier pledged $1 billion on Monday to help people recover from the floods. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Jordan Verlage)

  • Calgary firefighters check on homes as residents and volunteers are in clean up mode in the community of Bowness as most of the homes have been pumped out with still some remaining submerged in water in Calgary, Alberta, on Monday, June 24, 2013. Alberta's premier pledged $1 billion on Monday to help people recover from floods that devastated parts of the western Canadian province. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Nathan Denette)

  • A road crew foreman surveys the washed-out lanes of northbound MacLeod Trail in Calgary, Alta., Monday, June 24, 2013. Heavy rains caused flooding, closed roads, and forced evacuations across Southern Alberta. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Jeff McIntosh)

  • Thaya Gallant

    Thaya Gallant helps with the flood clean-up at a law office in Calgary, Alta., Monday, June 24, 2013. Heavy rains caused flooding, closed roads, and forced evacuations across Southern Alberta. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Jeff McIntosh)

  • Calgary firefighters check on home as residents and volunteers are in clean up mode in the community of Bowness as most of the homes have been pumped out with still some remaining submerged in water in Calgary, Alberta on Monday, June 24, 2013. Alberta's premier pledged $1 billion on Monday to help people recover from floods that devastated parts of the western Canadian province. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Nathan Denette)

  • People watch as the river peaks, causing flooding in Medicine hat, Alta., on Monday, June 24, 2013. Officials in Medicine Hat said Monday they believe water levels on the South Saskatchewan River have peaked and that flooding won't be as severe as initially feared. Roughly 10,000 people were evacuated as the city of 60,000 prepared for the surge of water that swamped Calgary and surrounding areas last week. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Nathan Denette)

  • Residents and volunteers are in clean up mode in the community of Bowness as most of the homes have been pumped out with still some remaining submerged in water in Calgary, Alberta on Monday, June 24, 2013. Alberta's premier pledged $1 billion on Monday to help people recover from floods that devastated parts of the western Canadian province. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Nathan Denette)

  • Lisa Nguyen

    Resident Lisa Nguyen, right, cleans of the mud from photographs and negatives as volunteer Jacinta Babbitt, left, shows a clean picture of Nguyen when she was younger during flood clean up in the community of Bowness in Calgary, Alberta on Monday, June 24, 2013. Alberta's premier pledged $1 billion on Monday to help people recover from floods that devastated parts of the western Canadian province. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Nathan Denette)

  • Residents and volunteers are in flood clean up mode in the community of Bowness in Calgary, Alberta on Monday, June 24, 2013. Alberta's premier pledged $1 billion on Monday to help people recover from floods that devastated parts of the western Canadian province. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Nathan Denette)

  • Daniel Boddy, nine, helps with the clean-up work as hose lines from pumps drain water from flooded basement in the Bridgeland neighborhood in Calgary, Alta., Sunday, June 23, 2013. Heavy rains caused flooding, closed roads, and forced evacuation across Southern Alberta.

  • Daniel Boddy, nine, helps with the clean-up work as hose lines from pumps drain water from flooded basement in the Bridgeland neighborhood in Calgary, Alta., Sunday, June 23, 2013. Heavy rains caused flooding, closed roads, and forced evacuation across Southern Alberta.

  • A boy crosses a silt covered street in Chinatown as clean-up crews work in Calgary, Alta., Sunday, June 23, 2013. Heavy rains caused flooding, closed roads, and forced evacuation across Southern Alberta.

  • People place sand bags as the river rises rapidly and begins flooding in Medicine Hat, Alberta, on Sunday, June 23, 2013.

  • Homeowner Glenn Tibbles looks at the damage done by floodwaters to his home near downtown Calgary, Alberta, on Sunday, June 23, 2013. About 65,000 residents of Calgary were being allowed to return to their homes Sunday to assess the damage from flooding that has left Alberta's largest city awash in debris and dirty water.

  • Cpl. Brett Martens from CFB Edmonton helps a resident clear out damaged debris from their home near downtown Calgary, Alberta, on Sunday, June 23, 2013. About 65,000 residents of Calgary were being allowed to return to their homes Sunday to assess the damage from flooding that has left Alberta's largest city awash in debris and dirty water.

  • A home is inundated with floodwaters on the Siksika First Nation, Alberta, on Sunday, June 23, 2013. Alberta's municipal affairs minister says 27 communities are under a state of emergency as some areas begin to recover from flooding while others are still bracing for it.

  • People watch as the river rises rapidly and begins flooding in Medicine Hat, Alta., on Sunday, June 23, 2013. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

  • Floodwaters inundate homes in Medicine Hat, Alberta, on Sunday, June 23, 2013. Alberta's municipal affairs minister says 27 communities are under a state of emergency as some areas begin to recover from flooding while others are still bracing for it.

 
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