Accessibility Canada

Reimagining Accessibility: Competition Results and Lessons Learned

Hon. David C. Onley | Posted 01.23.2014 | Canada Politics
Hon. David C. Onley

The quest for a more inclusive accessibility symbol continues. The re-worked designs will be featured at next year's DEEP Conference -- which will be held in conjunction with The Accessibility Conference hosted by Guelph University -- for the delegates' input.

The Wheelchair Is Just One Small Part of the Picture: Why It's Time to Reimagine Accessibility

Hon. David C. Onley | Posted 01.23.2014 | Canada Impact
Hon. David C. Onley

The nub of my and others' unease with the current International Symbol of Access is that it excludes over 97 per cent of people with disabilities, because it is all about wheelchairs, rather than accessibility. To those who fear that the competition I've launched is aimed at throwing the proverbial baby out with the bathwater and getting rid of the wheelchair symbol altogether: this is definitely not the case. What I'm asking is for designers to reimagine the concept of accessibility and to come up with a revised symbol or set of symbols that will be more inclusive.

Reimagining Accessibility and the Wheelchair Symbol

Hon. David C. Onley | Posted 11.27.2013 | Canada Impact
Hon. David C. Onley

In 1969, the universal symbol for accessibility -- a blue square overlaid in white with the stylized image of a figure in a wheelchair -- made its first appearance. But the symbol is still built around a stick figure -- not a person. But the most important problem with the International Symbol of Access is this: it is exclusionary. The symbol is all about the wheelchair -- even though the majority of disabilities are not mobility-related. That is why, with the enthusiastic co-operation of the Ontario College of Art and Design University, I have launched an international competition to find a contemporary symbol.

What I Would Change About Accessibility for People with Disabilities in Canada

Rick Hansen | Posted 08.29.2013 | Canada Impact
Rick Hansen

2013-06-21-blog_canada_day_v02.gif My goal has always been to build an even greater awareness of our need to move from a view that accessibility is just about getting in and out of buildings to a view of intentionally designing and creating fully inclusive communities, so that people with disabilities can fully participate.

ChangeMaker: Don't Call Him Disabled

Craig and Marc Kielburger | Posted 03.02.2013 | Canada Impact
Craig and Marc Kielburger

During his 22 years at CityTV, David Onley was an anchor, producer, science and technology specialist and weatherman. He was also Canada's first senior newscaster with a visible disability. Having lived with polio and post-polio syndrome since the age of three, he has broken down many social barriers. He has worked tirelessly to improve accessibility for all.