AFRICA FAMINE

Africa's Famine Turns One -- But Where is the West?

A year ago today famine was declared in the Horn of Africa. The worst drought in 60 years put millions of lives at risk. Canadians stepped up and donated $70 million, which the government matched. One year later, while the famine has been declared over, eight million people in Ethiopia, Kenya and Somalia still need emergency assistance.

The People of Sahel Need Help

For months now, all of us at the Humanitarian Coalition have been paying very close attention to the situation in the Sahel region of West Africa, where drought and food shortages are affecting an ever-growing number of families and communities. Today, more than 18.4 million people are facing severe hunger, including a million children who are at risk of acute malnutrition.

Why Do We Wait for Full-Blown Catastrophe?

Hunger in the Sahel region is increasing at a dangerous pace. While a full-blown crisis attracts more attention with vivid images and stories of severely malnourished children, it is by acting before the situation reaches that point that more lives can be saved.

The Loot Bag Boycott

I've been to Africa. I've hung out with kids whose only possession is a ball made of leaves. And guess what -- they were grateful for it. I'll be keeping this in mind when I forgo loot bags at my son's upcoming birthday, and donate the money saved to filling up some bellies.
AP

Horn of Africa Needs Water Justice

Most Westerners see the crisis in the Horn of Africa as a combination of a large population, chronic poverty, and corruption, and they believe that none of this will ever change, so giving money to this self perpetuating crisis is throwing it away. But I offer another narrative that I believe is closer to the truth.
Getty

We Need Aid Effectiveness to Beat Donation Frustration

The crisis in East Africa has prompted Canadians to open their wallets and their hearts, but with the sheer number of government agencies, NGOs and private sector organizations responding to humanitarian crises, it remains difficult to know who to support and how much of the money will actually get there.