Archaeology

A Brief History Of Medicinal Tattooing

Mara Raye Munro | Posted 04.05.2016 | Canada Living
Mara Raye Munro

Tattoos have long been considered to be much more than body decoration. The spiritual, social, personal and political significance of getting inked is an indelible aspect of body art, and most people who have undergone the uncomfortable, to outright painful procedure attest to it's intrinsic spiritual experience. But what about tattoos as a form of healing? What if there was a medicinal and curative element to this global ritual?

This Predator Had "Steak Knife" Teeth

University of Toronto News | Posted 04.12.2014 | Canada
University of Toronto News

The first top predators to walk on land were not afraid to bite off more than they could chew, a University of Toronto Mississauga study has found. G...

B.C.'s Archaeological Quirks Are Digs At Private Property Rights

Mark Milke | Posted 08.19.2013 | Canada British Columbia
Mark Milke

The government has acted illegally. In British Columbia, the provincial branch of the government continually demands owners of property designated as archaeologically significant pay for archaeological work before any redevelopment can proceed. It's a government arm that deems archaeological finds as publicly significant and should not burden private property owners.

I Travelled to Greece and Saw a Vampire

Sandra Garvie-Lok | Posted 12.31.2012 | Canada Living
Sandra Garvie-Lok

2012-10-31-halloweenbanner.jpg Most people go to Greece for beaches, ouzo and temples gleaming in the Mediterranean sun. I went for a vampire. But what I found there led me beyond pop culture images of vampires to a darker part of the human imagination. In the midst of searching for ancient ruins, an archaeological team from UBC stumbled on a cemetery from the time of the Ottoman empire. The lead researcher wanted an osteologist to study the skeletons -- especially one that might have been accused of being a vampire. There wasn't much question of not going, of course.