Bactéria

The Fecal Bacterium You'll Learn to Love

Jason Tetro | Posted 04.27.2015 | Canada Living
Jason Tetro

Within your feces is a species of bacteria that may one day be able to help prevent inflammatory disorders including colitis, inflammatory bowel disease and possibly even Crohn's disease. It's known as Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and has the potential to become one of the next generation probiotics.

How Chewing Gum Can Help Your Oral Health

Jason Tetro | Posted 03.27.2015 | Canada Living
Jason Tetro

The question has plagued dental professionals for years. Is chewing gum good or bad for your teeth? Last week, an international team of researchers provided the first comprehensive look at the impact of gum on oral health. It seems a few minutes of gum chewing might be an excellent way to keep a healthy mouth.

How Aging Affects Inflammation in Our Bodies

Jason Tetro | Posted 03.20.2015 | Canada Living
Jason Tetro

2012-05-28-GermGuyBanner.jpg If a person continued to supplement bacteria with our health in its best interests, such as probiotics, mutiny may be prevented or at least belayed. With more research, we may be able to prove this point and find a means to offer the elderly, the sick and even the brokenhearted a way to prevent the onslaught of virulence and live a happier, longer life.

Spice Up Your Health This Holiday Season

Jason Tetro | Posted 02.20.2015 | Canada Living
Jason Tetro

As the Spice Girls proclaim, spicing up your food can definitely spice up your life and offer joy both emotionally and physiologically. Whether you choose the bitterness of garlic, the sweetness of cinnamon or the umami and heat of a kimchi, you can ensure the time is filled with joy rather than pain.

Why You Shouldn't Worry About Using Public Toilets

Jason Tetro | Posted 02.13.2015 | Canada Living
Jason Tetro

2012-05-28-GermGuyBanner.jpg A closer inspection of the bacterial species revealed only few pathogenic species. Of those, most were unable to survive over long periods of time. There was little to no risk for infection. As to the majority of bacteria found, they were common, and harmless, fecal and skin bacteria. Even high frequency use of a toilet could not develop pathogens in high enough levels to cause infection.

The Bad News About Artificial Sweeteners

Jason Tetro | Posted 11.21.2014 | Canada Living
Jason Tetro

It's been a rather tough year for artificial sweeteners. In that time, three new studies have been released suggesting they are poor substitutes for sugar. In the spring, an investigation into their use revealed a disconcerting association with the onset of depression. Then, a long-term analysis of their use revealed they may contribute to overall weight gain.

Viruses of Bacteria May Help Win The War Against Cholera

Jason Tetro | Posted 11.07.2014 | Canada Living
Jason Tetro

2012-05-28-GermGuyBanner.jpgAntibiotics were the first and still are the go-to means of microbial distraction. However, in light of the continuing rise of antibiotic resistance, their usefulness is limited and we need to explore other options. One such ally is a living organism known to have just as much of a hatred for infectious bacteria: the bacteriophage.

Where To Find The Germiest Place In Your Home

The Huffington Post Canada | Posted 07.29.2014 | Canada Living

Germs might be a regular, healthy fact of life, but that doesn't mean you have to live in ignorance about where you can find them in your home. The...

How Probiotics Could Prevent Obesity and Other Chronic Diseases

Jason Tetro | Posted 09.26.2014 | Canada Living
Jason Tetro

2012-05-28-GermGuyBanner.jpgThe value of good germs has been known for decades. This was epitomized last month when an international group of researchers illustrated how the use of genetically modified probiotics could prevent chronic disease. Using only a specifically designed bacterium, they could prevent obesity in mice giving them a healthier life.

A Low-Carb Diet Cuts Risk of Colon Cancer

University of Toronto News | Posted 09.22.2014 | Canada Living
University of Toronto News

Researchers at the University of Toronto have found that gut bacteria drive a common form of colon cancer, and that a low-carbohydrate diet can prevent the disease. The researchers found that microbes in the intestine convert carbohydrates into metabolites that spur cancer growth. A low-carbohydrate diet shut down this process and led to a 75 per cent reduction in cancer incidence.

25 Germy Things You Should Probably Start Throwing Out

The Huffington Post Canada | Arti Patel | Posted 07.08.2014 | Canada Living

If that sad old kitchen sponge has been giving you the dirty eye for the past few weeks months, it may be time to toss it out. Take a look around ...

Important Lessons From the Bacterial Equivalent of Human Society

Jason Tetro | Posted 09.05.2014 | Canada
Jason Tetro

In terms of statistics, 12 per cent grew antibiotic resistance and became marginalized from others. Twenty-eight per cent of the population chose a wealthy style, happily living in their gated biofilms. Half of all the bacteria decided to take a middle-class lifestyle, choosing an easy nutrient source and never engaging in any extreme activity.

The Best Foods For Healthy Gut Bacteria

AFP/Relaxnews | Posted 06.23.2014 | Canada Living

For patients receiving stem cell transplants, some simple but important precautions to promote the proliferation and diversity of healthy gut bacteria...

Bacteria Could Increase Your Risk of a Heart Attack

Jason Tetro | Posted 08.16.2014 | Canada Living
Jason Tetro

Heart health is a complex study and requires a proper lifestyle to maintain. Yet, as the researchers have shown, should there appear to be signs of problems, such as continual chest pains, palpitations, lightheadedness, shortness of breath and fatigue; there may be yet another option for diagnosis and treatment to avoid a heartbreaking end.

Which Probiotics Actually Work?

Josh Gitalis | Posted 08.04.2014 | Canada
Josh Gitalis

The lactobacillus species is one of the most researched. Among the lactobacillus family is one particular strain, lactobacillus GG (also known as Culturelle), which has solid research backing up its use for acute diarrhea, traveller's diarrhea, antibiotic-associated diarrhea, and colic.

Antibiotic Resistance May Have Met Its Match

The Huffington Post Canada | Posted 05.25.2014 | Canada Living

UBC scientists may have won a battle in the ongoing fight against antibiotic resistance. Researchers with the university have found that a peptide ...

Twerk All You Want, Just Don't Get a Lip Tattoo Like Miley's

Jason Tetro | Posted 05.31.2014 | Canada Living
Jason Tetro

2012-05-28-GermGuyBanner.jpg When it comes to the climb of pop stardom, Miley Cyrus has proven she can't be tamed. Earlier this month, the singer posted a photo showing a new tattoo in a rather unlikely place: her lower lip. Unlike the other maneuvers, which may have social consequences, this one could lead to medical problems.

The Surprising Way Bacteria 'Talks' To Each Other

Jason Tetro | Posted 05.16.2014 | Canada Living
Jason Tetro

2012-05-28-GermGuyBanner.jpg The results suggested bacteria are continually in communication with one another. When times get dire, they attempt to find anyone who might have resistance and be willing to pass it on. Once there is a yes, a crowd appears, all hoping for the same gift. Once they get it, they head off to do the same.

The Beach Is Great for Sun, Surf and...Germs

Jason Tetro | Posted 05.09.2014 | Canada Living
Jason Tetro

2012-05-28-GermGuyBanner.jpg Many of us cannot wait for Mother Nature and journey to one of a plethora of pleasant places famous for their warmth. Amongst the most popular destinations, including Florida, California and the Caribbean, exist some of the most desirable beaches where millions congregate to take in the joys of sun, sea, sand, and unfortunately germs.

Evolution Made Easy, Courtesy of E. Coli

Jason Tetro | Posted 04.25.2014 | Canada
Jason Tetro

2012-05-28-GermGuyBanner.jpg Unlike humans, who need on average 20 years between generations, these small creatures only need about 20 minutes to foster offspring. This means that the bacterium can evolve some 500,000 times faster than us. This rapid rate offers the prime opportunity to explore some of the deeper mysteries and perhaps even offer mechanisms to best predict when evolution might happen to us.

How Long Can Germs Live On Surfaces?

AFP/Relaxnews | Posted 01.23.2014 | Canada Living

Prior research has already concluded that two common bacteria that cause colds, ear infections, and strep throat don't often live for long outside the...

Probiotics May Improve Symptoms of Autism

Jason Tetro | Posted 02.08.2014 | Canada Living
Jason Tetro

A collaboration of over 20 American researchers found a possible answer although at first glance, it seemed ludicrous. The team looked at the bacteria in the gut of both normal and autistic children in the hopes of identifying any changes. Indeed, there were.

Getting Dirty May Be Good for You

David Suzuki | Posted 11.06.2013 | Canada
David Suzuki

For much of human history we lived close to the natural world. As civilization evolved we became increasingly urbanized, and most of us now live in cities. As we've moved away from nature, we've seen a decline in other forms of life. Biodiversity is disappearing.

Your Smartphone Could Help Fight Disease

Jason Tetro | Posted 11.30.2013 | Canada Living
Jason Tetro

2012-05-28-GermGuyBanner.jpg Through the use of a common smartphone, we may be even closer to germs than ever, with the ability to not only see them, but also help researchers and medical professionals with applications ranging from disease diagnostics to helping in the fight against global health threats such as malaria.

How Germs Make Electricity From Human Waste

Jason Tetro | Posted 11.22.2013 | Canada Living
Jason Tetro

2012-05-28-GermGuyBanner.jpgWith an increase in population and the continuing threat of the end of the fossil fuel era, researchers have looked in other directions to help keep the lights on. In particular, one incredibly abundant resource on the planet, dead organic material collectively known as biomass has been identified as the future or renewable energy.