Bill C-30

Alamy

The Cyberbullying Bill Is A Virtual Big Brother in Disguise

Wednesday, Peter MacKay, the new Justice Minister, unveiled Bill C-13, the Protecting Canadians from Online Crime Act. The similarly-named bill is now marketed as an effort to crack-down cyber-bullying, yet the vast majority of the bill simply brings back many (though not all) lawful access provisions. As this post suggests, some of the provisions raise some serious concerns. Yet the government is signalling that it would prefer to avoid such debates, wrapping up the provisions in the cyber-bullying flag and backtracking on a commitment made earlier this year to not bring forward Criminal Code amendments that were contained in Bill C-30.
Alamy

Will This Bill Kill Online Spying?

The current terrain of Canadian spying legislation is complex. Bill C-30 is dead, and that is cause to celebrate. But it's also important to remain vigilant. Serious questions remain over bill C-55 and its so-called "emergency" situations, as well as how long authorities can continue to monitor communications after getting approval for intercept. At the same time, bill C-55 represents an opportunity to limit warrantless wiretaps to emergency situations only. Such a stipulation would prevent future attempts at mass surveillance along the lines of bill C-30.
CP/Alamy

Tories Kill Web Surveillance Bill

OTTAWA - The Conservative government has abandoned its controversial and much-maligned Internet surveillance bill, legislation it once claimed was crucial to stopping child pornographers.Less than a y...
Alamy

Vic Toews is Snooping in Your Data Again

The notorious online "snooping" bill, C-30, looks like it may be coming back for round two. But people shouldn't be complacent as efforts are underway to put C-30 back on the agenda. Towes claims that getting access to subscriber data is simply like getting access to a phone book. The privacy commissioners of Canada disagree. Canadians aren't fools. Privacy matters to us. So does balance. Justifications for online snooping by the state are not going to be solved by invoking buzzwords and bogeymen.
DR

The Other Tax Your Internet Bill Could Have Come With

In 2009, the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police (CACP) proposed several possibilities, including the creation of new public safety tax that would appear on monthly customer bills. As I noted in a post on fixing the bill, both the regulations and the cost issues should be made public before the bill is considered by a House of Commons committee.

Liberals Created Bill C-10

You've heard the opposition's all-out attacks on minimum sentences and Bill C- 30, which would adapt the investigative powers of police services to fight cybercrime. But it seems to me that a little embarrassment is in order. Who is behind Bill C-30? The Liberal government of Paul Martin.

A Brave New Blindness

@Vikileaks30 isn't only smear -- it's insulting to the very Canadians its creator supposedly intended to protect. Thanks to this person, Toews' mistress and their love-child have been subjected to a level of embarrassment to which no Canadian should be subjected. Does it demonstrate the level of privacy Bill C-30 might violate? Possibly -- but it came at the cost of people who had nothing to do with it.