Bill C-51

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Could This Be the Antidote to Bill C-51?

Today's the big day, folks: Wednesday morning, OpenMedia is launching our positive, pro-privacy action plan, packed with ideas from everyday Canadians about how to roll back Bill C-51, end mass surveillance, and restore the privacy rights of everyone who lives in Canada.

Bill C-51 Is Right to Criminalize the Advocacy of Terrorism

The advocacy of terrorism cannot be separated out neatly from the violence it generates. It is not an ancillary factor causally removed from its devastating result, but an inextricable feature of the recruitment methodology employed by terror-supporting states, terrorist organizations and their supporters.
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Bill C-51 Assumes Human Rights Can Be Trumped By National Security

The rushed passage of Bill C-51 through Parliament, the furthest-reaching national security reforms in Canada since 2001, continues. It is soon to be passed by the House of Commons and then head off to the Senate. And all signs are that the government intends to push it through the Senate as quickly as possible, with an eye to the Bill becoming law before the summer Parliamentary break. At its heart Bill C-51 grounds itself in the flawed notion that human rights have to give way when national security is on the line.
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Bill C-51 Would Jeopardize the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms

Bill C-51, dubbed the Anti-Terrorism Act, 2015, should cause Canadians deep concern. Its provisions, if passed into law, would jeopardize many of our most basic rights and liberties and would only serve to undermine the health of our democracy. Any limits imposed by Parliament on our basic rights and fundamental freedoms must be "reasonable"; they must not be overly broad; and they must be "demonstrably justified in a free and democratic society. On the thirty-third anniversary of the signing of the Charter, we should demand that Parliament scrap Bill C-51 altogether.
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Tories To Give Security Agencies A Boost

OTTAWA - The Conservative government plans to use the coming federal budget to underscore its pre-election messaging on the importance of national security.The budget due Tuesday is expected to earmar...
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Canadian Muslims Can Expect More Discrimination Under Bill C-51

Even after the Conservative government buckled to pressure to amend the anti-terrors laws, Canadians can still be deemed too dangerous to travel by airline and won't be allowed to challenge the "evidence" against them. As lawyer and author Faisal Kutty puts it, Canadian Muslims can be considered "too guilty to fly, but too innocent to charge." Bill C-51 is a reckless attempt to win over an understandably fearful electorate under the pretense of fighting terrorism. Marginalizing the very Canadians who are on the front-lines of this struggle is worse than poor policy -- it's a threat to all of us.
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Bill C-51 Poses a Serious Threat to Free Expression in Canada

Bill C-51 is complex, dangerous, and poses a serious threat to free expression in Canada. If found to be in violation of the proposed legislation, citizens and visitors could wind up slapped with censorship orders, detained without due process or imprisoned for up to five years. Is the federal government giving itself and its agencies more power to fight ISIS-like terrorism, or is it using high-profile tragedies to illegally spy, surveil and silence innocent citizens and its political enemies? Silencing Canadians with the threat of prosecution is tantamount to a chilling or denial of freedom of expression and association, among other Charter rights.
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Peaceful Protests Are Not a National Security Threat

Looking at Bill C-51, Ecojustice's primary concerns revolve around the proposed information-sharing regime and its implications for First Nations and environmentalists engaged in non-violent protests against fracking, pipelines, or other projects that pose serious risks to the environment and human health. Bill C-51 should be amended to exempt all forms of "advocacy, protest, dissent or artistic expression" so long as they do not endanger life. A peaceful Aboriginal blockade or environmental protest is not a national security threat.